Merck Diabetes and Hypertension Awards

Merck Diabetes Award

All medical undergraduates and postgraduates are invited to apply for the

Merck Diabetes Award 2017
Theme: Every Day is a Diabetes Day

Please submit a concept paper about:

  • How to improve the awareness about Diabetes Early Detection and Prevention in your country.
  • How to encourage your society, scientific community, local authorities, media and relevant stakeholders to Think and Act on Diabetes Every Day.
  • Your ideas of developing new policies, strategies, social media campaigns and more.

 

Merck Diabetes Award 2017

is:

“Postgraduate Diabetes Diploma with University of South Wales. Winners will be invited to attend the Merck Africa Luminary on 24th-25th October, 2017 in Cairo, Egypt to receive the award”.

Merck Diabetes Award is being rolled out in many of the African and Asian universities as part of our commitment to building diabetes capacity and improving access to quality and sustainable healthcare solutions in developing countries.

The aim of Merck Diabetes Award is to create a Diabetes Experts Platform across the globe.

Please submit your one page concept paper to:
submit@merckdiabetesaward.com

Submission deadline is 31st July 2017

Entry requirements:

Postgraduate Diploma

Health professionals, both UK and overseas, with an honors degree or equivalent (including international qualifications) are eligible to apply for the PG Diploma Diabetes course online.

Non graduates are also encouraged to apply (applicants will be asked to submit a piece of work for assessment to confirm that they are able to work comfortably at degree level).

Applicants should submit copies of the following with their application:

  • qualification certificates
  • one written reference
  • English language qualification (IELTS 6.5 or equivalent) please see University of South Wales for further details

Merck Hypertension Award

All medical undergraduates and postgraduates are invited to apply for the

Merck Hypertension Award 2017

Theme: What the Healthy Heart needs

Merck Hypertension Award is being rolled out in many of the African and Asian universities as part of our commitment to building healthcare capacity and improving access to quality and sustainable healthcare solutions in developing countries.

The aim of Merck Hypertension Award is to create a Hypertension Experts Platform across the globe.

To raise the required awareness to control and prevent hypertension, countries need systems, policies and services in place to promote universal health coverage and support healthy lifestyles: eating a balanced diet, reducing salt intake, avoiding harmful use of alcohol, getting regular exercise and stopping the use of tobacco.

Please submit a concept paper about:

  • How to improve the awareness about hypertension control and prevention in your country.
  • How to encourage your society, scientific community, local authorities, media and relevant stakeholders to think and act on Hypertension Every Day
  • Your ideas of developing new policies, strategies, social media campaigns and more.

Merck Hypertension Award 2017
is:

“Postgraduate Diploma in Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine with University of South Wales. Winners will be invited to attend the Merck Africa Luminary on 24th-25th October 2017 in Cairo, Egypt to receive the award”.

Please submit your one page concept paper to:
submit@MerckHypertensionAward.com

Submission deadline is 31st July 2017

Entry requirements:

Postgraduate Diploma

Health professionals, both UK and overseas, with an honors degree or equivalent (including international qualifications) are eligible to apply for the PG Diploma Diabetes course online.

Non graduates are also encouraged to apply (applicants will be asked to submit a piece of work for assessment to confirm that they are able to work comfortably at degree level).

Applicants should submit copies of the following with their application:

  • qualification certificates
  • one written reference
  • English language qualification (IELTS 6.5 or equivalent) please see University of South Wales for further details

For more information visit Merk’s Official website

MYTH 2: DIABETES IS A DEATH SENTENCE by Opawale Damilola

We recently started the discussion about Myths and Facts on Diabetes. If you missed the last post, kindly click here.

Today, we will continue on the discussion

MYTH 2: DIABETES IS A DEATH SENTENCE

FACT

Diabetes is not a death sentence. We established the last time that diabetes is a serious condition and is presently not curable. However, a diabetes diagnosis does not mean that you have been given an “expiry date”. It simply means you have to pay more attention to your health than before. 

There are several people who have lived with the disease for many years, some several decades and still living normal healthy lives without complications. 

We have a few testimonials from some of them:

Miss O.O, 17 years old – “I have been diabetic for 5 years. My living has been managed through regular use of Insulin, daily exercise, controlled diet, regular blood sugar checks and regular clinic visits. I am living well and happy”

Mrs. A.C. 52 year old diabetic diagnosed 9 years ago – “Basically what keeps me going is that I take my medications regularly, I choose my food carefully and I attend clinic regularly”

Mr. J.S – “When I was first diagnosed with the disease, I went online and read articles to educate myself. Diabetes education was a life saver for me. I have relationship with my doctors and that has been of great help”

 I will make attempts to outline a few things people living with diabetes must do to ensure that they live healthy and without complications

1. Have a positive attitude: Many people die not because the disease killed them but because they allowed the diagnosis to overwhelm them. Make up your mind to be happy, positive and active regardless of the fact that you have the disease

2. Get informed – Get information from authentic sources (Your doctors, support groups, books). This will help you understand better about the disease and how it should be managed. 

3. Drug Compliance: Take your medications religiously. Let your doctors prescribe drugs for you.

4. Know yourself – You need to know yourself to be able to recognize signs of when your sugar is going too low (hypoglycemia) or too high (hyperglycemia) and you need to know what to do at those times.

5. Diet Control: Contrary to the old teaching that diabetics have to eat only unripe fruits and vegetables. Studies have shown that diabetics can actually eat most of the food every other person eats, only that they need to eat them in right proportions. It is advisable to eat more of food that are high in fibre and low in calorie. Your doctor should educate you more about this.

6. Regular exercise: This also helps to control your blood sugar better, reduce weight, slows down ageing and improves heart function. However, rigorous exercise is not advised. Exercises recommended include brisk walking, swimming, cycling, Dancing, Playing court games, etc. 

7. Regular Clinic visit

8. Regular blood sugar checks

9. Avoid cigarette and alcohol consumption. These can worsen the disease.

10. Weight loss

11. Participate in support groups. 

People living with diabetes will benefit a lot from family support. 

In conclusion, Diabetes is a serious health condition which may have devastating consequences if not properly managed. 

People living with the disease must be ready to take responsibility for their health and they can live normal healthy lives. 

Please feel free to drop your questions and comments.

Feel free to send your diabetes related articles to thengdoc@gmail.com

Dr Oluwadamilola Opawale is a medical practitioner with interest in Public health and preventive medicine. She has had a stint of experience from the famous St. Nicholas hospital as a clinician.

She is also the President of IBuildAfrica Foundation, an NGO that reaches out to female adolescents, helping them maximize their potentials environment and background notwithstanding.

She has a passion to teach people how to stay healthy by imbibing healthy lifestyle and choices. 

Debunking Diabetes Myths. Part 1 by Damilola Opawale

Myth 1: Diabetes is caused when a person consumes too much sugary food and soft drinks

Fact:

The cause of Diabetes goes beyond the consumption of sugary meals. 

Diabetes is caused by a combination of hereditary (inherited) and lifestyle factors.

Let me break it down

Diabetes, presently incurable, is a disease condition that occurs when the body cannot use glucose (smallest form of sugar) well. A large portion of the food we eat is converted to glucose which is the main source of energy needed to fuel the body’s functions.

Glucose leaves our intestine and enters in the blood. From the blood, it is moved to the body cells where it is needed to produce energy or stored up for later use.

The substance (hormone) in the body that helps to move glucose from the blood to the cells is called INSULIN.

Insulin works like a key that opens the doors on the cells to allow glucose in. Without Insulin, glucose cannot enter the cells, so it stays in the blood.

Insulin is produced by an organ in the body called PANCREAS.

In some individuals, this insulin (the Key) is not produced at all or produced in insufficient amount due to some abnormalities in the genes of the persons. Hence the doors on the cells cannot be opened for glucose to enter. This is called Type 1 Diabetes which commonly affects Children and Teenagers.

In some other individuals, Insulin (the Key) is present, but the Key holes (called Receptors) on the cells are faulty, so they don’t respond when Insulin tries to open them to allow glucose in. 

This is called Type 2 Diabetes which commonly affects adults.

As a result of inability of glucose to enter the cells in these individuals, glucose level in the blood becomes higher than normal and can continue to rise if nothing is done. 

High levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood and low levels of glucose (sugar) in the cells are the causes of all the problems that Diabetes cause.

From what we have discussed above, it is obvious that eating a lot of sugar is not the main cause of Diabetes. 

However, Diabetics (people who have diabetes) have to be careful with what they eat since there is a problem with the process involved in the use of glucose.

Being overweight has been found to increase the risk for developing Type 2 Diabetes and a diet high in sugar can contribute to weight gain. For this reason, it is generally advisable for everyone to carefully regulate their consumption of high calorie food (food that ultimately lead to high sugar in the body). 

Feel free to drop your comments, contributions and share.

#KnowledgeIsKey#


Feel free to send your diabetes related articles to thengdoc@gmail.com.



Dr Oluwadamilola Opawale is a medical practitioner with interest in Public health and preventive medicine. She has had a stint of experience from the famous St. Nicholas hospital as a clinician.

She is also the President of IBuildAfrica Foundation, an NGO that reaches out to female adolescents, helping them maximize their potentials environment and background notwithstanding.

She has a passion to teach people how to stay healthy by imbibing healthy lifestyle and choices. 

NGDOC D-Meetup 2017

The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community is organizing a D-Meetup for Children living with diabetes in Nigeria.
The aim of the D-Meetup aims to create an amazing experience for children living with diabetes in a medically safe environment and will run over a weekend.

The activities will centre around children living with diabetes between the ages of 12 – 21 years to meet and share their experiences with one another as they learn to take responsibility for their health status and also to create in them a “I can do it” attitude as they improve on their self-esteem.

wpid-aviary_1448913080416.jpg

This meetup will include meeting with People living with Diabetes Globally, Nutritionist, Paediatric endocrinologist; Tourism; Games; Dinner amongst others.

It also will foster their physical activities and more controlled access to food relative to their experience at home while monitoring a good glycemic control.


Interested in partnering with us contact us on ngdoc@gmail.com or ngdocdmeetup@gmail.com

Do you know any child living with diabetes within the age of 12 – 21 years kindly encourage them to fill the form to participate.

Are you interested in sponsoring this event or volunteering your time and talent to make this event a success? Kindly fill this form.

Diabetes Hand Foundation application for MasterLab Leadership Institute.

The diabetes hand foundation new MasterLab Leadership Institute will be an intensive, exciting, weekend conference featuring expert mentorship, leadership development, and social entrepreneurship workshops to support leaders implementing positive changes for the greater diabetes community.

MasterLab Leadership Institute is Seeking:
  • Passionate, driven leaders in the early stages of a project to improve life with diabetes.
  • Non-profits, small businesses, social enterprises, grassroots projects, or anything in between.
  • Applicants and projects that represent the diversity of the diabetes community: Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes, POC, LGBTQIA+, & international friends encouraged to apply.
Benefits of Attending:
  • 20 accepted Fellows accepted into the 2017 cohort will be given a fully-funded scholarship, and flown to the San Francisco Bay Area for an intensive weekend (March 31-April 2).
  • Fellows will attend hands-on workshops with expert mentorship from innovation experts, entrepreneurs, and non-profit leaders.
  • Fellows will learn how to refine their organizational model, use the lean startup method, sharpen their leadership toolkit, find sustainable funding, and increase their social impact.
Vision:

Through our work in the diabetes space, we’ve seen the need for more diverse community leadership, and sufficient support for those passionate leaders. Often, people touched by diabetes are under-represented in decision-making spaces and leadership roles. In addition, the Diabetes Online Community (DOC), previous MasterLab events, and community leadership have had an underrepresentation of people touched by Type 2 diabetes and people of color. This is in contrast to the fact that “…American Indians and Alaska Natives, black or African Americans, Hispanics or Latinos, and Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders, have a higher prevalence and greater burden of diabetes compared to whites…” (ClinicalDiabetes Journal, 2012).

Through this program, our goal is to robustly support a diverse group of diabetes advocates and leaders that represent the full spectrum of the diabetes community – Type 1, Type 2, etc. We are looking for emerging leaders who are passionate about creating change, want support to advance their projects, and are driven to create meaningful impact.

Instructions for Applying:

Please see below for additional details; we hope you apply! Applications due February 15. Questions about the program not answered below can be emailed to Mandy Jones, Director of Advocacy, at mandy@diabeteshf.org.

For more information visit their website 

POLITICS OF DIABETES IN NIGERIA

The recent series of tweets by the USA senator and presidential aspirant, Senator Bernie Sanders, ‘attacking’ insulin makers, that followed a letter sent by him and his counterpart in the House of Representatives to the Department of Justice and Federal Trade Commission on the need for investigating insulin makers for price collusion was a result of his identification with diabetes (which runs in his family) especially during his campaign for Democrats nomination.

Bernie is not the only USA politician advocating on behalf of the People Living with Diabetes (PWD) , Senator Jenne Shaheen who is the leader of the US Senate Diabetes Caucus was quoted to be committed to ensuring that diabetes is a ” priority for legislation no matter what happens in the election” of 2012.  Her commitment could also be linked to her identification with her diabetic granddaughter.

Moreover, the revelation by the UK Prime Minister, Theresa May, on her Type 1 diabetes status in addition to the functional relationship between the UK Parliament and several diabetes groups in the UK points to the fact that fight for the people with diabetes is a major cause for UK politicians. The act of identifying with diabetes and other non communicable diseases by politicians is a common trend across the developed countries, and this has propelled them to advocating, legislating and making policies for the education, prevention, diagnosing and management of diabetes mellitus in their respective countries.

One of the tweets by Bernie Sanders on his twitter handle @sensanders reads “in the richest nation in the world diabetes patients are being forced to decide between eating and paying for the drugs they need”.

I was prompted to respond by comparing the condition of the people with diabetes (PWD) in poor and unstable nations with those in rich countries that are being sympathised with.

Also, my reaction to the letter by Bernie and his colleague on insulin price is by asking for who are to be the defenders for the “weak and helpless” people living with type 1 diabetes (PWT1D) in poor countries like Nigeria.

My last response was inspired by the attitude of politicians across Africa especially Nigeria where disclosure of true health status of politicians seems abominable whether they are being affected by common diseases or not.

Their practice is to embark on medical tourism to developed countries for treatment and management of such diseases secretly  while people only engage in speculation about their health status . For instance, former President Olusegun Obasanjo was forced to disclose his battle with diabetes over several number of years by his need to get votes for his successor who later died in government due to a then undisclosed ailment. This was at the tail end of his (Obasanjo) eight year tenure.

The failure of Nigerian politicians to identify with non-communicable diseases especially diabetes, by which many of them are believed to be affected, and their ability to travel abroad for treatment make them not to have any inspiration or encouragement to make any specific serious legislation, policy or advocacy that is needed to support the common people on the care and management of diabetes, as many are being afflicted and killed by the disease due to their helplessness.

This is evident in the absence of any specific health policy or program on diabetes, lack of appropriate medical facilities for diagnosis and care, inadequate funding for non-communicable diseases, shortage of diabetes specialists and caregivers, inadequate education on prevention and management of diabetes, absence of any parliamentary resolution on diabetes and absence of any regulation on access to and price of diabetic drugs, (especially insulin) among others.

However, according to International Diabetes Federation (IDF), as at year 2015 out of 415 million people living with diabetes in the world, 75 percent are in the poor and middle income countries with Sub-Sahara Africa accounting for 14.2 million . It is shown that prevalence rate of diabetes in Nigeria is 1.9 percent for adults and 3 out of 100,000 children while around 949, 900 persons are undiagnosed. Among 5 million people that die due to diabetes annually across the world Nigeria accounts for more than 40,000. Relatively, Nigeria leads in the number of incidence of and mortality rate from the disease in Africa.

Meanwhile, the current economic condition, a result of economic recession, in the country is making self management of diabetes unaffordable for the people living with diabetes.

The reliance on importation of all the much needed diabetic supplies,  continuous fall in the exchange rate of Naira to foreign currencies, galloping inflation and dwindling real income have all contributed to unaffordability and inaccessibility of the supplies most especially insulin.

The price of each of the items has skyrocketed to about 150 percent increase within a short period of eight months. Choosing myself as a typical sample of an average  person living with diabetes in the country , my monthly costs of supplies currently within Lagos metropolis could be broken down as follows :

Insulin ( Mixtard of 100 IU)              N5500 per vial

Syringes                                                       N2500 per pack of 100 units

Glucometer (Accu-chek Active)    N8000

Meter test strips                                    N4600 per pack

Diabetic multivitamin                        N3400

All these prices are only obtainable within Lagos which is the major commercial city in the country, but in other cities and towns most of the supplies are either much more costlier or not totally available. Meanwhile , my monthly income stands at around N25000 out of which I spend around N16000 on the supplies (64 percent) . The cost of transportation and other implicit costs are yet to be included.

Despite all the available statistics on diabetes, though actually underestimated because of absence of credible medical data gathering in the country, and the plight of the people living with diabetes in managing the condition there is no any serious political will on the part of policy makers, and in spite of signing up with Global Action on Non-communicable diseases, to help the people with diabetes out of the challenges being faced in the need to lead fulfilled lives, and reduce the level prevalence of the disease.

Nigeria is only chosen in this article as a reflective sample for all the poor and politically unstable countries of the world, which means that the conditions of the people living with diabetes in these countries, especially in Africa, need urgent and serious actions on the part of their politicians on supports for adequate management as well as on the need for measures for prevention to reduce the rate of prevalence.

So, the question still remains as who will fight for the ‘weak and helpless’ people living with diabetes in the poor countries?

Olafimihan Nasiru Titilope is living with diabetes can be reached on nasoola77@yahoo.com

 

The article posted is strictly the responsibility of the author. NGdoc  will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. This article is featured on an as-is basis.

TYPE[1]WRITER TO FACILITATE INSULIN ACCESS TO NIGERIAN CWDS

This was the start of a beautiful friendship and the creation of our diabetes project. Back in 2013 I had the pleasure of meeting Adejumo Hakeem from Nigeria.

We’d been in constant communication prior to the International Diabetes Federation Conference in Melbourne as I’d managed to win their essay competition, ‘Diabetes in Nigeria: Protecting the Future’.

I even went on to write my masters on ‘The Relationship Between Urbanisation and Type 2 Diabetes: a human rights-based approach to health in Nigeria’. So here we were, online friends from New Zealand and Nigeria, finally able to cross the ocean and meet in person.

screen-shot-2016-11-15-at-00-12-43

It’s been 6 months since the book was launched and the sales are still doing great. The profits from my book go directly to Adejumo at NGdoc to aid children with type 1 diabetes in Nigeria who do not have access to the supplies they need to survive. There are already stories of young children who we, and our consumers, have supported. If you have bought a book – YOU helped a child!

Our very first child was enough to spur us on, the fact that we’d made a difference in someone’s life is very humbling. Oluwatimileyin Daniel was 14 years old and in a state of diabetes ketoacidosis in hospital as his family had no money to buy insulin. Through our partnership we were able to pay for both the insulin and glucometer test strips he needed. He was lucky, many are not.

If you want to help us make a difference you can buy the book, or the cheaper e-book version on Amazon. If your child has type 1 diabetes they will hopefully love the book and be saving another child at the same time

Culled from type1writerblog 

Carrie Hetherington can be contacted here

HEALTHUCATE TO ORGANIZE FREE HEALTH SCREENING TO COMEMMORATE 2016 WORLD DIABETES DAY.

On November 14 every year, the whole world joins forces to raise awareness about diabetes, its prevention and management. 

This year, the theme is Eyes on Diabetes and one of the key messages is that screening for type 2 diabetes is important to modify its course and reduce the risk of complications. 

Healthucate Nigeria, a health promotion social enterprise charging to the frontlines in the fight against Nutrition Related Non-Communicable Diseases (NRNCDs) will conduct a week long free health screening exercise in Abeokuta, Ogun State to commemorate the 2016 World Diabetes Day.

Free health screenings such as blood pressure and blood sugar and Body Mass Index (BMI) would be available on Monday, 14th and Wednesday, 16th November at Healthucate’s Nutrition and Wellness Centre in Aladesanmi, Abeokuta between 9 a.m. and 12 noon. 

On Saturday, the 19th, a mobile testing clinic would be set up at Abiola Way to enable more people have access to get tested. 

On Saturday, Rapid Diagnostic Tests for malaria would also be carried out with provision of subsidized ACT drugs for positive cases.

A Nutritionist and Dietician would be on ground to offer counselling to the participants while suspected diabetes cases will be referred to a health facility. 

Through this free health screening, Healthucate hopes to test over 300 persons for diabetes type 2 and reach out to over 700 persons with information about diabetes prevention and management.

For more information, you can reach Healthucate via email at info@healthucateng.org or phone at 08154664638

FDA APPROVES ARTIFICIAL PANCREASE SYSTEM.

According to the American Diabetes Association, the FDA approved the first hybrid insulin delivery system on the 28th of September, 2016. 

This critical step, according to the ADA website in the development of an artificial pancreas is an important milestone for people with type 1 diabetes.

The MiniMed 670G is the first pump-sensor system to automatically adjust basal insulin levels, up or down, based on continuous glucose readings from an integrated continuous glucose monitor.

Patients will continue to make insulin dosing decisions at mealtime, with the MiniMed 670G providing dose recommendations based on the patient’s blood glucose levels and trends.

Patients will also need to perform finger-stick glucose checks for calibration of the device. 

The system is appropriate for anyone who is currently using or is a good candidate for an insulin pump. 

The FDA has approved the MiniMed 670G for people age 14 and older.

We are excited for this advancement, and we look forward to the development of the next phase of automated systems that can provide bolus doses of insulin. We envision that these incremental innovations will lead to a fully automated closed-loop system to provide optimal glucose control and independence for people with diabetes.

HOW DOES A CONTINUOS GLUCOSE MONITOR (CGM) WORK

CGM is a way to measure glucose levels in real-time throughout the day and night. 

A tiny electrode called a glucose sensor is inserted under the skin to measure glucose levels in tissue fluid. 

It is connected to a transmitter that sends the information via wireless radio frequency to a monitoring and display device. The device can detect and notify you if your glucose is reaching a high or low limit.

To engage with the Diabetes Online Community follow The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community on Facebook NGDOC and on Twitter @theNGdoc

– See more at: http://www.diabetes.org/newsroom/press-releases/2016/american-diabetes-association-FDA-approval-first-hybrid.html?referrer=https://t.co/VkIIhiSJFd#sthash.qkMPxHBk.dpuf

Keeping a Food Diary

Recording what you eat can help with blood glucose control and weight

Keeping a diabetes food diary is an imporatant factor to consider in living with diabetes.

It helps to understand how our body reacts to the food and medication we take.

For a start it is important to have a diary of what we eat and our medications with our blood sugar level for a week to help us better manage our diabetes.  

Benefits of Food Diary 

Helps you understand better your body’s response to the food you take.

Helps your doctor or dietitian see how you’re doing over time. It helps access what you eat, when you eat and the amount of nutrients each meals makes available to your body.

By recording your blood sugar there’s a better understanding of the particular dosage that works best for you as it reveals the trend of sugar fluctuation in the body.

Things to note in a Food Diary.

1) Meal:  Your food diary should contains details about the meals taken and snacks too, i.e what meal, the quantity  (if possible), was it home cooked or bought, the constituents in terms of protein, carbohydrates, fat and oil.

To include the quantity of water or drink taken.

2) Mood. Try to record how you are feeling when you eat, if or how long you exercised prior to eating, and record your blood sugar levels. Emotions can play a big role in what you eat, when you eat and how you manage your diabetes.

3) Exercise. Exercise is an important part of diabetes management. Track your progress, including how many steps you take per day and other activities— what exercise you did, for how long, and how intensely.

4) Medications. List what you took and the time. If you want to be more thorough, list any vitamins or supplements you have taken as well.

5) Blood sugar levels. Record your pre- and post-meal levels, as well as what you were doing at the time. Were you working? Watching TV? Talking on the phone?

However, worth noting is that many people living with diabetes sometimes go through small transition periods when eating right seems to go off the rails and so can blood glucose and it can be hard to figure out why.

But by taking the time to slow down, write things down for a week or two, and just focusing back on managing diabetes, maybe by using a diary, one is much more likely to get back on track as we account more for what we eat.

Paper diaries seem a bit ‘back to basics’ but they can really work wonders. However, you can also keep your diary on your mobile phones.

References

https://www.verywell.com/how-a-diabetes-food-diary-can-help-you-1087715

http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/food-diary.html

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