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NGDOC D-Meetup 2017

The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community is organizing a D-Meetup for Children living with diabetes in Nigeria.
The aim of the D-Meetup aims to create an amazing experience for children living with diabetes in a medically safe environment and will run over a weekend.

The activities will centre around children living with diabetes between the ages of 12 – 21 years to meet and share their experiences with one another as they learn to take responsibility for their health status and also to create in them a “I can do it” attitude as they improve on their self-esteem.

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This meetup will include meeting with People living with Diabetes Globally, Nutritionist, Paediatric endocrinologist; Tourism; Games; Dinner amongst others.

It also will foster their physical activities and more controlled access to food relative to their experience at home while monitoring a good glycemic control.


Interested in partnering with us contact us on ngdoc@gmail.com or ngdocdmeetup@gmail.com

Do you know any child living with diabetes within the age of 12 – 21 years kindly encourage them to fill the form to participate.

Are you interested in sponsoring this event or volunteering your time and talent to make this event a success? Kindly fill this form.

Diabetes Hand Foundation application for MasterLab Leadership Institute.

The diabetes hand foundation new MasterLab Leadership Institute will be an intensive, exciting, weekend conference featuring expert mentorship, leadership development, and social entrepreneurship workshops to support leaders implementing positive changes for the greater diabetes community.

MasterLab Leadership Institute is Seeking:
  • Passionate, driven leaders in the early stages of a project to improve life with diabetes.
  • Non-profits, small businesses, social enterprises, grassroots projects, or anything in between.
  • Applicants and projects that represent the diversity of the diabetes community: Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes, POC, LGBTQIA+, & international friends encouraged to apply.
Benefits of Attending:
  • 20 accepted Fellows accepted into the 2017 cohort will be given a fully-funded scholarship, and flown to the San Francisco Bay Area for an intensive weekend (March 31-April 2).
  • Fellows will attend hands-on workshops with expert mentorship from innovation experts, entrepreneurs, and non-profit leaders.
  • Fellows will learn how to refine their organizational model, use the lean startup method, sharpen their leadership toolkit, find sustainable funding, and increase their social impact.
Vision:

Through our work in the diabetes space, we’ve seen the need for more diverse community leadership, and sufficient support for those passionate leaders. Often, people touched by diabetes are under-represented in decision-making spaces and leadership roles. In addition, the Diabetes Online Community (DOC), previous MasterLab events, and community leadership have had an underrepresentation of people touched by Type 2 diabetes and people of color. This is in contrast to the fact that “…American Indians and Alaska Natives, black or African Americans, Hispanics or Latinos, and Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders, have a higher prevalence and greater burden of diabetes compared to whites…” (ClinicalDiabetes Journal, 2012).

Through this program, our goal is to robustly support a diverse group of diabetes advocates and leaders that represent the full spectrum of the diabetes community – Type 1, Type 2, etc. We are looking for emerging leaders who are passionate about creating change, want support to advance their projects, and are driven to create meaningful impact.

Instructions for Applying:

Please see below for additional details; we hope you apply! Applications due February 15. Questions about the program not answered below can be emailed to Mandy Jones, Director of Advocacy, at mandy@diabeteshf.org.

For more information visit their website 

POLITICS OF DIABETES IN NIGERIA

The recent series of tweets by the USA senator and presidential aspirant, Senator Bernie Sanders, ‘attacking’ insulin makers, that followed a letter sent by him and his counterpart in the House of Representatives to the Department of Justice and Federal Trade Commission on the need for investigating insulin makers for price collusion was a result of his identification with diabetes (which runs in his family) especially during his campaign for Democrats nomination.

Bernie is not the only USA politician advocating on behalf of the People Living with Diabetes (PWD) , Senator Jenne Shaheen who is the leader of the US Senate Diabetes Caucus was quoted to be committed to ensuring that diabetes is a ” priority for legislation no matter what happens in the election” of 2012.  Her commitment could also be linked to her identification with her diabetic granddaughter.

Moreover, the revelation by the UK Prime Minister, Theresa May, on her Type 1 diabetes status in addition to the functional relationship between the UK Parliament and several diabetes groups in the UK points to the fact that fight for the people with diabetes is a major cause for UK politicians. The act of identifying with diabetes and other non communicable diseases by politicians is a common trend across the developed countries, and this has propelled them to advocating, legislating and making policies for the education, prevention, diagnosing and management of diabetes mellitus in their respective countries.

One of the tweets by Bernie Sanders on his twitter handle @sensanders reads “in the richest nation in the world diabetes patients are being forced to decide between eating and paying for the drugs they need”.

I was prompted to respond by comparing the condition of the people with diabetes (PWD) in poor and unstable nations with those in rich countries that are being sympathised with.

Also, my reaction to the letter by Bernie and his colleague on insulin price is by asking for who are to be the defenders for the “weak and helpless” people living with type 1 diabetes (PWT1D) in poor countries like Nigeria.

My last response was inspired by the attitude of politicians across Africa especially Nigeria where disclosure of true health status of politicians seems abominable whether they are being affected by common diseases or not.

Their practice is to embark on medical tourism to developed countries for treatment and management of such diseases secretly  while people only engage in speculation about their health status . For instance, former President Olusegun Obasanjo was forced to disclose his battle with diabetes over several number of years by his need to get votes for his successor who later died in government due to a then undisclosed ailment. This was at the tail end of his (Obasanjo) eight year tenure.

The failure of Nigerian politicians to identify with non-communicable diseases especially diabetes, by which many of them are believed to be affected, and their ability to travel abroad for treatment make them not to have any inspiration or encouragement to make any specific serious legislation, policy or advocacy that is needed to support the common people on the care and management of diabetes, as many are being afflicted and killed by the disease due to their helplessness.

This is evident in the absence of any specific health policy or program on diabetes, lack of appropriate medical facilities for diagnosis and care, inadequate funding for non-communicable diseases, shortage of diabetes specialists and caregivers, inadequate education on prevention and management of diabetes, absence of any parliamentary resolution on diabetes and absence of any regulation on access to and price of diabetic drugs, (especially insulin) among others.

However, according to International Diabetes Federation (IDF), as at year 2015 out of 415 million people living with diabetes in the world, 75 percent are in the poor and middle income countries with Sub-Sahara Africa accounting for 14.2 million . It is shown that prevalence rate of diabetes in Nigeria is 1.9 percent for adults and 3 out of 100,000 children while around 949, 900 persons are undiagnosed. Among 5 million people that die due to diabetes annually across the world Nigeria accounts for more than 40,000. Relatively, Nigeria leads in the number of incidence of and mortality rate from the disease in Africa.

Meanwhile, the current economic condition, a result of economic recession, in the country is making self management of diabetes unaffordable for the people living with diabetes.

The reliance on importation of all the much needed diabetic supplies,  continuous fall in the exchange rate of Naira to foreign currencies, galloping inflation and dwindling real income have all contributed to unaffordability and inaccessibility of the supplies most especially insulin.

The price of each of the items has skyrocketed to about 150 percent increase within a short period of eight months. Choosing myself as a typical sample of an average  person living with diabetes in the country , my monthly costs of supplies currently within Lagos metropolis could be broken down as follows :

Insulin ( Mixtard of 100 IU)              N5500 per vial

Syringes                                                       N2500 per pack of 100 units

Glucometer (Accu-chek Active)    N8000

Meter test strips                                    N4600 per pack

Diabetic multivitamin                        N3400

All these prices are only obtainable within Lagos which is the major commercial city in the country, but in other cities and towns most of the supplies are either much more costlier or not totally available. Meanwhile , my monthly income stands at around N25000 out of which I spend around N16000 on the supplies (64 percent) . The cost of transportation and other implicit costs are yet to be included.

Despite all the available statistics on diabetes, though actually underestimated because of absence of credible medical data gathering in the country, and the plight of the people living with diabetes in managing the condition there is no any serious political will on the part of policy makers, and in spite of signing up with Global Action on Non-communicable diseases, to help the people with diabetes out of the challenges being faced in the need to lead fulfilled lives, and reduce the level prevalence of the disease.

Nigeria is only chosen in this article as a reflective sample for all the poor and politically unstable countries of the world, which means that the conditions of the people living with diabetes in these countries, especially in Africa, need urgent and serious actions on the part of their politicians on supports for adequate management as well as on the need for measures for prevention to reduce the rate of prevalence.

So, the question still remains as who will fight for the ‘weak and helpless’ people living with diabetes in the poor countries?

Olafimihan Nasiru Titilope is living with diabetes can be reached on nasoola77@yahoo.com

 

The article posted is strictly the responsibility of the author. NGdoc  will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. This article is featured on an as-is basis.

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TYPE[1]WRITER TO FACILITATE INSULIN ACCESS TO NIGERIAN CWDS

This was the start of a beautiful friendship and the creation of our diabetes project. Back in 2013 I had the pleasure of meeting Adejumo Hakeem from Nigeria.

We’d been in constant communication prior to the International Diabetes Federation Conference in Melbourne as I’d managed to win their essay competition, ‘Diabetes in Nigeria: Protecting the Future’.

I even went on to write my masters on ‘The Relationship Between Urbanisation and Type 2 Diabetes: a human rights-based approach to health in Nigeria’. So here we were, online friends from New Zealand and Nigeria, finally able to cross the ocean and meet in person.

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It’s been 6 months since the book was launched and the sales are still doing great. The profits from my book go directly to Adejumo at NGdoc to aid children with type 1 diabetes in Nigeria who do not have access to the supplies they need to survive. There are already stories of young children who we, and our consumers, have supported. If you have bought a book – YOU helped a child!

Our very first child was enough to spur us on, the fact that we’d made a difference in someone’s life is very humbling. Oluwatimileyin Daniel was 14 years old and in a state of diabetes ketoacidosis in hospital as his family had no money to buy insulin. Through our partnership we were able to pay for both the insulin and glucometer test strips he needed. He was lucky, many are not.

If you want to help us make a difference you can buy the book, or the cheaper e-book version on Amazon. If your child has type 1 diabetes they will hopefully love the book and be saving another child at the same time

Culled from type1writerblog 

Carrie Hetherington can be contacted here

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HEALTHUCATE TO ORGANIZE FREE HEALTH SCREENING TO COMEMMORATE 2016 WORLD DIABETES DAY.

On November 14 every year, the whole world joins forces to raise awareness about diabetes, its prevention and management. 

This year, the theme is Eyes on Diabetes and one of the key messages is that screening for type 2 diabetes is important to modify its course and reduce the risk of complications. 

Healthucate Nigeria, a health promotion social enterprise charging to the frontlines in the fight against Nutrition Related Non-Communicable Diseases (NRNCDs) will conduct a week long free health screening exercise in Abeokuta, Ogun State to commemorate the 2016 World Diabetes Day.

Free health screenings such as blood pressure and blood sugar and Body Mass Index (BMI) would be available on Monday, 14th and Wednesday, 16th November at Healthucate’s Nutrition and Wellness Centre in Aladesanmi, Abeokuta between 9 a.m. and 12 noon. 

On Saturday, the 19th, a mobile testing clinic would be set up at Abiola Way to enable more people have access to get tested. 

On Saturday, Rapid Diagnostic Tests for malaria would also be carried out with provision of subsidized ACT drugs for positive cases.

A Nutritionist and Dietician would be on ground to offer counselling to the participants while suspected diabetes cases will be referred to a health facility. 

Through this free health screening, Healthucate hopes to test over 300 persons for diabetes type 2 and reach out to over 700 persons with information about diabetes prevention and management.

For more information, you can reach Healthucate via email at info@healthucateng.org or phone at 08154664638

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FDA APPROVES ARTIFICIAL PANCREASE SYSTEM.

According to the American Diabetes Association, the FDA approved the first hybrid insulin delivery system on the 28th of September, 2016. 

This critical step, according to the ADA website in the development of an artificial pancreas is an important milestone for people with type 1 diabetes.

The MiniMed 670G is the first pump-sensor system to automatically adjust basal insulin levels, up or down, based on continuous glucose readings from an integrated continuous glucose monitor.

Patients will continue to make insulin dosing decisions at mealtime, with the MiniMed 670G providing dose recommendations based on the patient’s blood glucose levels and trends.

Patients will also need to perform finger-stick glucose checks for calibration of the device. 

The system is appropriate for anyone who is currently using or is a good candidate for an insulin pump. 

The FDA has approved the MiniMed 670G for people age 14 and older.

We are excited for this advancement, and we look forward to the development of the next phase of automated systems that can provide bolus doses of insulin. We envision that these incremental innovations will lead to a fully automated closed-loop system to provide optimal glucose control and independence for people with diabetes.

HOW DOES A CONTINUOS GLUCOSE MONITOR (CGM) WORK

CGM is a way to measure glucose levels in real-time throughout the day and night. 

A tiny electrode called a glucose sensor is inserted under the skin to measure glucose levels in tissue fluid. 

It is connected to a transmitter that sends the information via wireless radio frequency to a monitoring and display device. The device can detect and notify you if your glucose is reaching a high or low limit.

To engage with the Diabetes Online Community follow The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community on Facebook NGDOC and on Twitter @theNGdoc

– See more at: http://www.diabetes.org/newsroom/press-releases/2016/american-diabetes-association-FDA-approval-first-hybrid.html?referrer=https://t.co/VkIIhiSJFd#sthash.qkMPxHBk.dpuf

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Keeping a Food Diary

Recording what you eat can help with blood glucose control and weight

Keeping a diabetes food diary is an imporatant factor to consider in living with diabetes.

It helps to understand how our body reacts to the food and medication we take.

For a start it is important to have a diary of what we eat and our medications with our blood sugar level for a week to help us better manage our diabetes.  

Benefits of Food Diary 

Helps you understand better your body’s response to the food you take.

Helps your doctor or dietitian see how you’re doing over time. It helps access what you eat, when you eat and the amount of nutrients each meals makes available to your body.

By recording your blood sugar there’s a better understanding of the particular dosage that works best for you as it reveals the trend of sugar fluctuation in the body.

Things to note in a Food Diary.

1) Meal:  Your food diary should contains details about the meals taken and snacks too, i.e what meal, the quantity  (if possible), was it home cooked or bought, the constituents in terms of protein, carbohydrates, fat and oil.

To include the quantity of water or drink taken.

2) Mood. Try to record how you are feeling when you eat, if or how long you exercised prior to eating, and record your blood sugar levels. Emotions can play a big role in what you eat, when you eat and how you manage your diabetes.

3) Exercise. Exercise is an important part of diabetes management. Track your progress, including how many steps you take per day and other activities— what exercise you did, for how long, and how intensely.

4) Medications. List what you took and the time. If you want to be more thorough, list any vitamins or supplements you have taken as well.

5) Blood sugar levels. Record your pre- and post-meal levels, as well as what you were doing at the time. Were you working? Watching TV? Talking on the phone?

However, worth noting is that many people living with diabetes sometimes go through small transition periods when eating right seems to go off the rails and so can blood glucose and it can be hard to figure out why.

But by taking the time to slow down, write things down for a week or two, and just focusing back on managing diabetes, maybe by using a diary, one is much more likely to get back on track as we account more for what we eat.

Paper diaries seem a bit ‘back to basics’ but they can really work wonders. However, you can also keep your diary on your mobile phones.

References

https://www.verywell.com/how-a-diabetes-food-diary-can-help-you-1087715

http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/food-diary.html

Raising a child living with diabetes in Africa: Challenges and Motivations

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On May 27th The Nigeria Diabetes online Community conducted it’s monthly chat dedicated to children living with diabetes in Africa.

The chat that coincides with Children’s day in Nigeria drew participants from Nigeria, UK, South Africa and Ghana.

The children’s day chat reflects the reality that faces us as a nation and africa as a continent on the need for a vibrant healthcare sector to combat the scourge of diabetes.

All our participants have wards living with diabetes (we encourage parents and guardians to get their wards involved in social peer support chats online).

Most wards view living with diabetes as a burden (stressful,frustrating, depressive and expensive – in the words of pearl who has young relatives living with diabetes) with a few having a good insight of the condition.

Large percentage of our wards living with diabetes seemingly initially have a feeling of being the only ones with such condition in the world.
(A typical reflection of poor awareness of other children living with diabetes)

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Living with diabetes for children has been noticed to be emotionally challenging and it’s been suggested by experience that more interaction and peer support works in Ghana with listening ears producing better results  than criticisms.

Parents and guardians have been advised to stay involved in their children’s care even if such wards is able to manage his/her diabetes.

At this point parents should be aware of that their support, respect and love for each other has a direct impact on their child’s metabolism (a good thesis for research)

It was also noted that there’s a constant battle of emotions as the children hit their teens with their tendencies to want to fit in like their friends.

In cases when their emotions are really all over the place, a constant show of love, mentoring and continuous education about diabetes has been noted to be very helpful.

It was unanimously agreed by all participants that interacting with other children living with diabetes worldwide is very helpful with NGO’s and government being actively involved in ensuring living with diabetes for our children doesn’t end up as a death sentence.

We graciously call on the minister of health in all african countries to emulate the South Africa government who is said to provide free medications to include insulin and glucose strips.

The international diabetes federation life for a child has been commended for their active support in resource poor settings where insulin, glucometers and teststrips are provided for free.

We also call on governments to ensure these supplies gets to the children import tax free.

Wouldn’t it be great to see life saving medications donated for free exempted from import tax which could be enormous?

We wish to thank all our participants for their contributions and commitments to ensuring an healthy life with diabetes is achievable by our children.

Do you have or know any child living with diabetes?
Kindly get through to us on our platforms and we will be glad to connect.
thengdoc@gmail.com
Facebook: NGDOC
Twitter: @thengdoc

The 3rd Africa Diabetes Congress (YAOUNDE 2017)

3rd AFRICA DIABETES CONGRESS CALL!

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PRE CONGRESS WORKSHOPS 17-19 APRIL 2017

CONGRESS DATES: 19-22 APRIL 2017

CONGRESS STREAMS:

1.       Education and patients

2.       Clinical

3.       Basic sciences and physiology

4.       Epidemiology public health

5.       Endocrinology (including paediatrics and reproductive)

CORPORATE SYMPOSIA

Wednesday 19th April 2017: 3 from 14:00 – 15:30

Thursday 20th April 2017: 3 from 12.30 – 14:00 and 2 from 18:00 – 20:00

Friday 21st April 2017: 2 from 12.30 – 14:00

 

SOCIAL PROGRAMME

Opening Ceremony: Wednesday 19th April 2017 from 17:30 – 18:30

Welcome reception: Wednesday 19th April 2017 from 18:30 – 19:30

Congress dinner: Friday 21st April 2017 from 19:00 – 22:00

 

IMPORTANT DATES

First Announcement: 30th April 2016

Second Announcement and Call for Abstracts: 1stJune 2016

Abstract Dateline: 30th October 2016

Breaking Abstract Dateline: 15th January 2017

Early Registration Dateline: 1st February 2017

 

PUBLICATION OF ABSTRACTS

 

Accepted abstracts for oral presentation, poster discussion and poster display will be published in a Supplement of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

Congress Secretariat.

Yaounde – Cameroon.

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Amputations: the politics behind limb loss

This email was forwarded and we obtained permission to post on our blogs for our visitors.#
A lovely writeup on diabetes and lim salvage by a seasoned HCP.

Do find time to read and enjoy

Cutting off people’s legs is never a pleasant job for the surgeon;

But many times there are, when it’s the only way forward;the only way to save a life.

Apart from limbs lost to trauma via accidents, or to cancers, today the leading cause of limb loss ‎across the world is chronic non communicable disease in one form or another and diabetes ranks a leading offender ;

Diabetes is not a disease until it is made to be.

it is made to be when high sugar is made into high grief ‎;

High grief when mere number set to a higher than normal level by regulatory defects in the body is allowed to hold the body hostage for too long.

A high sugar effectively beaten down and kept so keeps the diabetic away from diabetes : diabetes sans diabetes.

Each time I’ve come across a rotten leg from diabetes, the chances are more often than not

I always opine

there is more than diabetes to blame.

…there is the patient who might have been too slack or not compliant enough,

….the treatment regime that might ‎have become too unsuited to the challenges at hand

Or

….the diabetes that has become part of a larger complex ravaging the particular patient :

in clinical parlance,part of a multimorbidity transcending mere sugariness.

Diabetologists are the sugar experts but any clinician unable or unwilling to offer tangible help with the management of diabetes in its most general sense is likely to come to grief at some point in his career.

Surgeons are regularly sucked into the sugar issue but sadly often to bring bitter pills.

Uncontrolled sugar over a long enough period raids virtually every tissue of the victim, none less so than the blood vessels.
Increasing deterioration in calibre and reflex performance of the blood vessels lead to progressive interference in the circulatory status of the tissues, gradually compromising the nutritional transactions at the tissue interfaces.

Add to this, the simultaneous deterioration in the integrity of the nerves, compromising their sensory efficiencies,

….the stage is more than set for tissue death :

a death that may even be so painless

and thus unnoticed if and when any attendant nerve damage has also come to compromise the ability to feel.

Bacteria lurk everywhere: the good and the bad. When they smell luck, they rush to the spot, and their feeding frenzy only expedites the rate at which tissue is lost and the system beyond poisoned.

The ultimate compound effect is a sore, which no matter how small it started can fester into a huge crater, as deep as it is wide.

To have flesh eating bacteria ( saprophytes) in the vicinity of sugar laden tissues poses a particular danger to the uncontrolled diabetic:

not just to the limb, the entire system.

Any organ can be lost to diabetes but particularly the limbs.

As a clinician and surgeon, , I’ve always ‎favored saving a limb to sacrificing it.

But there are ironically too many patients who are their own worst enemies ‎.

When a bad leg ulcer presents itself to the surgical clinic, what is often required to heal it can involve far more ‎sacrifices than what is required to amputate the leg.

And though some Surgeons might be constitutionally reluctant for protracted involvement with ulcer care,opting instead to dovetail the drama into an amputation, some patients, inspite of the words dripping between their lips are often themselves too indisciplined to withstand the drawn out rigor attendant to limb saving protocols ;

they cheat on themselves or are frankly non compliant with limb saving regimes.

Or

sometimes the cost involved healing an ulcer ( daily dressing, antimicrobials, regular tissue trimmings, restricted activities, regular blood checks, upped dosages etc) might prove too prohibitive to the payer.

An ulcer is any break in the skin lining; But it can very rapidly progress to well beyond the skin to involve underlying fat, muscles and bones.

Surgeons have evolved various ways to classify these ulcers to facilitate communication between and betwixt handlers :

But by and large, most of the classification systems speak to depth or width or more commonly both along with notions about presence or absence of associated infections

For any ulcer to heal,the strategic aim is reverse the very process or processes that led to it in the first instance.

In many cases, such reversal is possible with or without difficulties.

In others, fixed damages to the support system in the particular part, like the blood vessels and nerves prevent reversibility ‎.

This latter group forms the bulk of cases that may lose limbs. There are many agents on the shelves that are aimed at countering the negatives inside an ulcer;

Those that will kill offensive germs

Or

improve blood flow

Or

expand oxygen supply

Or

bring vital elements to the arena

Or

prevent water logging

Or

retard tissue destruction.

Or

any number of petty but contributary roles towards recovery.

For many years, research has concentrated on stealing ideas from the body itself ;seeking to break into the secrets of the body regulatory pathways ; it’s innate checks and balances.

Luckily the body is getting to yield more and more of its secrets to those researchers who relentlessly knock at its many doors.

And through these unlocked secrets, the applied science at the bed sideis ‎getting richly and confidently relevant .
One thing is clear ; biologically nothing ever happens in the body unless pulled or pushed.

There are no happenstances where the body is concerned.

If my foot turns red,something has pushed or pulled the red to the foot or in the foot ‎.

Every cell is responding to something under a complex but well ordained set of traffic rules ‎.

For a cell to grow, it must be pushed to grow.

And the pushers of such growth are called growth factors.

But the pushers of growth( growth factors) are unable to push if the cell to be pushedhas no handles that can be engaged by pushers’ hands.

These handles when they exist ‎are called receptors.

So growth factors to be fully relevant must have growth receptors granting a hole into which reciprocal key can fit to unlock the handle to the transaction.

The pusher ( growth factor) engages the ‎handle ( growth receptor) on the pushed then the cell grows.

Growth often means multiplication when the process is unfettered.

If an ulcer is loss of tissue anywhere between the skin level and deeper, it also means if the area can be brought under the influence of growth factors, new cells can be produced to replace lost ones:

And like mortar filling up a hole in the floor, the new cells can fill up the hole in say the leg.

This is a simplistic analysis, but as true as it ever gets.

The new drive towards cure of stubborn leg ulcers is now the use of growth factors.

But their use is still patchy,by and large restricted to research centres.

Cuban scientists have for the past nine years been trying to get their newly found products

( herbeprotP) into the wider market but read through below ( in red) and see how politics can retard progress , leaving amputations at run away levels

HerbeprotP is drug formulation composed of epidermal growth factor ; the growth pusher that can stimulate cell production at depleted sites causing tissue defects to fill up and stave off amputation.

But standing in its path is politics.

The embargo is preventing the drug from getting out of Cuba to be tested for claimed impact on the wider market.

wish to know more about the polit‎ics standing in the path of ulcer healing and limb salvage ?
‎…………..

“I don’t know what’s going to happen, but I do know that it may be that American legs are being lost while Cuban legs are being saved because Washington agencies …won’t allow that medicine in,”

said Dr. I. Kelman Cohen, professor emeritus in surgery at Virginia Commonwealth University.

“I think all the American medical community really wants is for Heberprot to be allowed into the country for testing

…Let’s get it tested and see if it will really save the thousands of limbs that many believe it can,” Cohen said.

In December, 2013, 111 members of Congress petitioned the Treasury secretary to allow the drug to be tested in the U.S., but up to now there has been no sign of progress, according to several lawmakers who signed the letter.

Diplomatic talks between Washington and the Castro government on issues such as immigration, travel and commercial ventures are scheduled to start next week.

At a briefing today on Obama’s normalization plans, administration officials were asked about the status of Heberprot but were noncommittal.

A proven drug that will thwart flesh-destroying diabetic wounds is desperately sought by physicians throughout the world, according to Dr. David Armstrong, professor of surgery and director of the University of Arizona’s Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance.

Diabetes researchers at Umeå University in Sweden reported in 2013 that worldwide, a limb is lost every 20 seconds because of a foot ulcer that doesn’t heal.

According to the American Diabetes Association, in the U.S. alone more than 73,000 diabetics undergo amputations every year, or about one every seven minutes.

“It just rips me apart to know that there may be something out there that has the potential to save limbs and we can’t get a chance to test it because of politics rather than public health,”

Armstrong said in an interview.

Each year, he and his team at the Tucson medical center spend hours in operating rooms trying to save the lower limbs of more than 11,000 patients from around the world.

“So far this year, there have been several patients who may have benefited from a study of the type needed for the Cuban drug,” he said.

Dr. Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association, said that “there is politics in everything” but putting public health before politics is of prime importance to his organization, which just last month signed a agreement to work more closely with its Cuban counterparts.

“We recognize that there is opportunity for allowing them to learn from us, but even more importantly, for us to learn from them and that would include any technological advances they may have made that still need to be studied and validated,”

Benjamin said.

There is nothing mysterious about the path between diabetes and the loss of a limb.

Untreated or poorly treated, diabetes often interferes with blood flow to the extremities, causing vascular disease, a failure in anti-bacterial defenses and nerve damage.

Because of this loss of protective sensation, diabetic ulcers form but often go undetected. Without a proper blood supply, the tissue around the ulcer becomes infected, continues to die and the wound grows.

Hyperbaric oxygen treatment is sometimes useful, say diabetes specialists, but surgical removal of the dead flesh is the typical treatment. And at a certain point, amputation becomes the only option to save the life of the patient.

Dr. Elof Eriksson, a Harvard University professor and chief of plastic surgery and a wound care expert at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, last month returned from an international meeting of hundreds of wound specialists near Havana.

He called the results of studies presented at the conference on Heberprot’s effectiveness to treat severe diabetic ulcers “impressive.”

“The only definite answer can come from a large clinical trial,” Eriksson said.
‎.

‎When Republicans continue to threaten reversing obama ‘s thaw of US- Cuban relationship, the public health implications are numerous : this is just one.

Building walls between nations, the type Cruz and Trump want to do retard intellectual and scientific diffusion of knowledge and skills ; those of us who know this too well have no choice but fight against a Republican victory by any means.

Basil jide fadipe.
Justin fadipe centre.
He is a Surgeon in the Carribeans.
His hobbies includes writing on anything about life and living.
West indies.

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