Tag Archives: Diabetes

Diabetes Advocates Protest Against High Insulin Prices

When Frederick Banting discovered Insulin in 1922, he never thought it’s prices would be as high as what is obtainable today.

Source: T1International

Insulin is a vital drug that is needed for people living with diabetes to survive but the increasing prices have caused people to ration insulin doses and skip injections causing poor control of their blood sugar.
On Saturday, 9th of September, 2017, T1International, an advocacy group for people living with type 1 diabetes around the world and People of Faith for Access to Medicines (PFAM) along with other stakeholders led a demonstration in front of Eli Lilly and Company International corporate headquarters in downtown Indianapolis. The day for online action was September 8th, 2017.

“We spend more money on diabetes than on our house payments,” Indiana resident Erin Roberts said.
Mike Hoskins who was at the protest said on his blog that he was spending $700 per month to get 3 vials of insulin in 2015 and that was more than half of housing cost per month and he had to borrow from a friend.

Consumers of these products are frustrated and have come out in mass to express their feelings. Parents of children living with diabetes and other concerned persons participated in the protest. Some people lamented that they have to pick between buying their groceries and buying insulin.

Some protesters at the demonstration.
Source: T1International

The 3 main pharmaceutical companies producing insulin are Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk, and Sanofi and they’ve continually increased the prices of insulin.
March 2017 saw another increase of Eli Lilly’s insulin product ; Humalog and Humilin by 7.8 percent.

Lilly is said to have raised the price of its version of insulin by over 300% over the past seven years. A U.S. patient’s out-of-pocket cost for a month’s supply of Eli Lilly’s Humalog can be over $400 (About 144,000 Naira).

In July 2017 it was reported that Lilly had a 35% increase in quarterly profits: $1+ billion, on $5.82 billion revenue. Though Eli Lilly recently started a patients assistance program when people complained about the costs, it is still grossly inadequate as only a small number of people would benefit.

Humalog has seen a 1123 percent increase in price since June 1996.
The insulin makers have also argued that its costs a great deal for advancements to produce new and better insulin.

Photo credit : Business insider

An Eli Lilly spokesperson responded in an email saying, “We are pleased that people in the diabetes community are engaged in this issue, and demonstrations are one way to do so. It will take continued effort across the healthcare system to affect real change, and Lilly is committed to working with others to make it happen.”

People with diabetes are asking Eli Lilly for three things:
• Be transparent about how much it costs to make one vial of Humalog insulin
• Be transparent about your profits from each vial
• Lower the price of insulin

So many people are dying from diabetic ketoacidosis because they can’t afford insulin.
For a long time, Africa was thought to be safe from diseases called “diseases of affluence,” like diabetes which plague the Western world but this is now known to be false as there is an increasing statistic of people living with diabetes and this includes both rich and poor.

As at 2013, the Nigerian government was reportedly spending $500 million (78.5 million Naira at that time) on importation of insulin annually. Insulin access is still a major problem in developing countries too.

On the pages of Indystar on Saturday

You can still lend a voice to the cause via social media.
Hashtag is #Insulin4all . You can get more information on Facebook and other social media sites.

Hashtag

SPONSORING ORGANIZATIONS OF THE DEMONSTRATION:

T1International

People of Faith for Access to Medicines

Public Citizen 

Patients for Affordable Drugs

DIABEDUCATION

INTRODUCTION

image

Currently in Nigeria, the emphasis of most policies and interventions is on screening and early treatment.

Though diabetes education forms a part of most strategies, screening of people at risk is the main focus.
The current strategies that exist in Nigeria are mainly health-care facility based and as such do not provide adequate information to the teeming population.

According to the IDF Diabetes Atlas (2013), about 3.9million out of the 78 million adult population in Nigeria (20-79years) is diabetic.
This puts the National prevalence of type 2 diabetes at approximately 5%. According to the same report, about 105,000 diabetes related deaths occurred in 2013.

There is thus a need for improved diabetes education and awareness

WHY DIABEDUCATION?

DIABEDUCATION is aimed at imbibing healthy living lifestyle, good physical activities among young individuals as well as make them diabetes advocates in their schools and communities through adequate diabetes education in a “catch them young approach”.

image

The training manual was developed to teach basic symptomalogy of the disease in easy to understand plain language for children and adults as well as utilizing community focused advocacy methods and via the use of social media- the latest social trend as a veritable tool for diabetes advocacy.

With Nigeria’s mobile subscriber base estimated to grow by a significant 14 percent this year to 120 million, utilization of social media in youth health advocacy will help educate, motivate, encourage, and act as a viable propagation medium for adequate diabetes information and education among Nigerians.

With this project we will be directly training over a hundred secondary school students across Ogun State who will then create awareness and educate their peers and community hence indirectly affecting over a hundred thousand individuals across the state.

Our profound gratitude goes to The Ogun State Government, The Ogun State Ministry of Health and the Department of Public health and School health board for the tremendous support.

We also say a big thank you to the Honorable Commissioner for Health for Ogun State, Dr Olaokun Soyinka, Mr Talabi Olumuyiwa – Patron of The Talabi Diabetes Center, the Directors, Facilitators, Volunteers, Sponsors and finally our contributing authors.

This program is scheduled to hold on the 16th of April, 2015. Follow the hashtag #diabeducation on Twitter and on Facebook.

Interested in being a part of the program either as a sponsor or volunteer? Please send us an email on thengdoc@gmail.com

DIABLINK… A platform for children living with Type 1 Diabetes in Nigeria

IMG_7106

Someone once told me our children are dying, our future is dying and Type 1 diabetes mellitus is the killer!

Type 1 diabetes mellitus formerly known as “juvenile-onset” diabetes because it was thought to develop mostly in children or young adults but now has been known to affect people of any age.

Prevention they say is better than cure. The most devastating part of type 1 diabetes is that it’s neither preventable nor curable and it affects children more. As a chronic disease with serious consequences, if left untreated, can result in death.

Type 1 diabetes is most likely a polygenic condition with a number of potential environmental risk factors being implicated to include dietary factors, initiation of bovine milk in babies, infectious agents (for example viruses like enterovirus, rotavirus, rubella), chemicals and toxins, —but results have however been inconclusive.

Type 1 diabetes is usually caused by an auto-immune reaction where the body’s defense system attacks the pancreatic cells that produce insulin.

Children with Type 1 diabetes produce little or no insulin- the hormone that. converts sugar, starch and other food into energy needed for daily life which makes them require daily insulin in order to control blood glucose. Consequently lack of access to insulin will result in complications and might eventually lead to death.

Most children with diabetes may end up developing debilitating complications such as blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, diabetes ketoacidosis – a common presentation at the emergency centers in hospitals. All these complications from Type 1 diabetes are devastating for these children, their family, and the health system.

Besides physical problems, children with Type 1 diabetes can experience anxiety and depression from living a restricted lifestyle. They may lose productivity due to school absences because of the development of complications. Changing personal routines can also affect other family members. The physical, social, economic and emotional burden of Type 1 diabetes can’t be underestimated.

Even though diabetes is a serious problem, it is manageable and requires appropriate and timely intervention. Diabetes can be managed as insulin replacement through lifelong insulin injections everyday, following a healthy diet and eating plan, taking regular exercises and monitoring of blood glucose levels regularly.

The management of children living with Type 1 diabetes poses a huge financial burden on their families especially in the developing world. Most families can not afford a continuous availability of insulin for these children resulting in most complications and death.

In view of these challenges, Diablink was created as a platform for advocating for the welfare of Type1 diabetes children and is embedded in and developed from The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community (NGDoc) as a response to the realization of the problems children living with diabetes face or will face upon diagnosis.

Diablink is aimed at the management of emergency cases of Type 1 diabetes where parents can’t afford treatment and subsequently linking Nigerian children living with Type 1 diabetes with others globally, creating pen pal relationships among them, thus creating social peer empowerment for them.

For more information on Type 1 diabetes mellitus in Nigeria you can read our piece on “Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Nigeria: rare or not obvious” – here

Until recently funds for the availability of insulin as well as building supportive communities for children with Type 1 diabetes have been generated internally by NGdoc volunteers but we look forward to partnering with interested individuals, corporate organizations and NGOs to help us make this life changing endeavor.

Health is a right not a privilege; let’s build a world that is fit for all children because every child matters.

Foluke Ajose

Partner with us today and together let’s touch lives of those living with diabetes in Nigeria. We can be reached on +234 703 885 5224; +234 812 616 2561 or t1diablink@ngdoc.com for further discussions.

Dr Foluke Ajose is an NGdoc volunteer and is currently the coordinator of Diablink.

References

http://www.mayoclinic.org

http://www.ngdocblog.com

IDF POSTERS NOW IN OUR LOCAL LANGUAGES

We are excited to have the International Diabetes Federation Posters in our local languages. We believe these posters will go a long way to educate Nigerians most especially those in rural areas.

These posters are good for popular locations in the community like Churches, Mosques, Town Halls, Market squares, recreation centers and cultural centres.

If you are interested in making these posters available in your community, kindly send us an email thengdoc@gmail.com.

Below are the snapshots and thanks to our translators who made this possible.

WDD Hausa 1

WDD Hausa 2

WDD Hausa 3

WDD Hausa 4

WDD Yoruba 4

WDD Ibo 1

WDD Ibo 2

WDD Ibo 3

WDD Ibo 4

WDD Yoruba 1

WDD Yoruba 2

WDD Yoruba 3

Thanks to the International Diabetes Federation and our Awesome Translators: Oyewusi Oluwafemi, Chukuma Arinze and Zainab Mahmoud.

NOW LETS GET THE MESSAGE ACROSS NIGERIA!

More about The IDF can be seen here

THE AFRICA DIABETES CONGRESS (YAOUNDE 2014)

The Africa Diabetes Congress of the International Diabetes Federation took place at the Palaise de Congress in Yaounde Cameroun from the 25th to the 28 February 2014.

Palaise de Congress
Palaise de Congress

 

The 2nd African Diabetes Congress appropriately themed: “Diabetes: Challenges and opportunities in Africa” provided an ideal opportunity for researchers, health care providers, practitioners, students, people living with diabetes to cross fertilize with colleagues from Africa and mingle with international renowned experts in the field of diabetes.

20140227_081806

About 1,000  participants from about 45 countries were there to raise awareness on diabetes and its impact by convening at the IDF Africa diabetes congress to exchange research and best practices on diabetes prevention, treatment and management.

NGdoc ADC2014

 Cross section of Participants at the ADC2014

The international Diabetes Federation (I.D.F) is the umbrella body organization of over 200 national diabetes associations in over 160 countries. It represents the interests and the growing numbers of people with diabetes and those at risk. The Federation has been leading the global diabetes community since 1950.

DSC03750

Cross-section of participants at the pre-congress post graduate course on Research Methodology/Scientific writing

 A Pre-congress update course on Research Methodology/Scientific writing where about 30 young researchers from all over Africa were trained and updated on recent trends in research methodologies and scientific writing.

According to the Chairman organizing committee and former International Diabetes Federation, President Professor Mbanya the young scientists are expected to through the training received translate diabetes research and care in Africa to meet up to global standard. 

DSC03766

 Discussing the challenges facing diabetes care in Africa over lunch

Simultaneously, a pre-conference update course on Advocacy was running where selected individuals from different countries attended and were trained on how to advocate, engage the government and ensure right policies are effected in their respective countries .

Policy advocacy is one of the most effective ways to achieve public health goals by ensuring that necessary resources, policies and political will are available to support, scale up, and sustain diabetes efforts within broader NCD programs.

IMG_0813

 Mobolaji Dauda from Nigeria and Pamela Donggo from Uganda at the Update course

We strongly believe that this congress will be one that wont be quickly forgotten as it laid a solid foundation not just for subsequent congresses but also diabetes research, prevention and care in Africa generally.

The 2nd Africa Diabetes Congress was made bilingual through an impressive translation efforts of the Medical Students of the University of Yaounde (a feat that was very professional and commendable).

The Organizers through the efforts of the platinum sponsors were able to sponsor about 600 participants for the congress, a remarkable and great achievement.

20140227_105307-1

With recent announcement of the startoff of the Africa Diabetes Study Group and Africa Diabetes Journal we are rest assured that IDF Africa through the ADC is positioning itself for the task of curbing the diabetes epidermic in the continent.

We wish to appreciate the congress organizers who through the support of El-Lilly were able to fully sponsor 2 members of The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community for the pre-congress update course and congress and also through Servier provided accommodation for 4 members of The Nigeria diabetes online community for the period of the congress.

We believe supports like this is important in not just building young researchers but also inspiring more youths into diabetes care and prevention in their respective communities all over africa.

PHOTO SPEAKS

NgdocADC2014POST GRADUATE COURSE IN RESEARCH METHODS AND SCIENTIFIC WRITING

 

IMG_0882SHOWCASING THE RICH TRADITIONAL CULTURE OF CAMEROON

 

NGdocADC2014THE OPENING CEREMONY OF THE 2ND AFRICA DIABETES CONGRESS

IMG_0856OPENING CEREMONY WITH THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH OF CAMEROON

IMG_0857GUEST LECTURE BY GEORGE ALBERTI (UK)

 

DSC03814ONE OF THE SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS

IMG_0851ONE OF THE SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS

20140227_115712

PROF MBANYA ADMONISHING THE NGDOC TEAM AT THE LILLY DIABETES CONVERSATION MAP STAND

DSC03783

DIABETES WALK

 

20140226_230203-1NIGERIAN DELEGATES TO THE ADC WITH PROF TOM JOHNSON (4TH FROM THE LEFT)

 

DSC03850YOUNG RESEARCHERS FROM AFRICA

 

20140226_223435-1

LILLY HOSTED US TO A DINNER

 

20140227_205731

GALA NIGHT

 

DSC03802

 

 

The next Africa diabetes congress will be hosted by Uganda. UGANDA 2016

SPARE A ROSE AND SAVE A CHILD

20140131-195133.jpg

Image credit @ConnectInMotion

Valentine is a season of love but for children around the world with type 1 diabetes, lack of access to insulin is
the most common cause of death.

And in some areas of the world, most children with diabetes can expect to live less than a year past their diagnosis date – if they’re diagnosed at all.

20140131-142933.jpg

This Valentine’s day, our community can help change that.

Under the Spare a Rose, Save a Child campaign, (a Diabetes Hand Foundation Campaign) we will help create awareness and gain donations and awareness for Life for a Child, an International Diabetes Federation program aiming to fund the continuous medical care, access to supplies and medication, and diabetes education that children in developing nations need to stay alive.

Spare a Rose, Save a Child
is simple:

You buy one less rose this Valentine’s Day and share the value of that flower
with a child with diabetes in the developing world.

Your loved one at home still receives flowers and you both give help to a child with diabetes who desperately
needs it.

A rose is about 5 bucks, for that one rose, IDF can give a child one month of life.

A dozen roses, a year of life for a child with diabetes. You can watch the video of how Lives have been saved by the International Diabetes Federation here

Click here to donate

Please note that all funds goes directly to the International Diabetes Federation Life For A Child Program.
Thank you.

For more information contact us on thengdoc@gmail.com

20140131-142907.jpg

STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING DIABETES CARE IN NIGERIA (SIDCAIN) call for abstracts

20140130-164324.jpg

STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING DIABETES CARE IN NIGERIA (SIDCAIN) call for abstracts for its 2014 Annual Scientific Conference and distinguished personality lecture holding in Ile-Ife from March 5th – 7th, 2014.

SIDCAIN was construed about 7 years ago with major objective of curbing the rising diabetes pandemic in the country through translational research. The core team comprises researchers in the field of diabetes and hypertension spread across the major tertiary institutions in the South Western States of Nigeria.

The team holds its annual non-communicable disease conference and distinguished personality lecture.

Previous events held in Ibadan, Osogbo and Sagamu whilst personalities such as Are Afe Babalola, Prof. John Idoko (NACA), former president, Chief Olusegun Obasanjo and Mr Dele Momodu (Ovation) have given the lectures.

The 2014 event will hold at the main Auditorium of Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital, Ile-Ife.
The event, as with the previous one will attract participants from all over the country and overseas.

THEME: Diabetes: Towards better Diabetes Prevention and Control

Sub-theme: DREAMS come true!

Distinguished Personality Lecturer: Dr Olusegun Mimilko, Executive Governor, Ondo State.
Keynote Speaker: Prof. Segun Fatusi, Provost, College of Health Sciences, OAU, Ile-Ife.
International Guest Speakers: Dr Dokun Ayotunde and Dr R Balogun (University of Virginia, VA, USA).

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Abstracts should be in English language, typed double spaced, in Times New Roman font 12 and not exceeding 250 words.
2. Abstract should be structured into the following subheadings:

Statement of the research problem:::Objectives:::Methods:::Conclusions.
3. All abstracts must be received by Sunday February 9, 2014.
4. Submission is strictly by email to jokotade2012@yahoo.com or sidcainprojectteam@gmail.com

REGISTRATION

A. Doctors
Early registration before February 15th, 2014 – N15,000
After February 15th, 2014 or on site – N20,000

B. All other healthcare professionals:
Early registration before February 15th, 2014 – N12,000
After February 15th, 2014 or on site – N15,000

3. All Students
Early registration before February 15th, 2014 – N5,000
After February 15th, 2014 or on site – N8,000

NOTE: 10 CPD credits obtainable.

Registration payments to:
ACCOUNT NAME: SIDCAIN PROJECT ACCOUNT
BANK: GUARANTY TRUST BANK
ACCOUNT NO: 0050055367

For futher enquiries, contact:
1. SIDCAIN via sidcainprojectteam@gmail.com www.sidcain.org
2. Dr Jokotade via jokotade2012@yahoo.com
3. NGDOC via thengdoc@gmail.com

20140130-211018.jpg

DIABETES AND PREGNANCY

20131223-220239.jpg

Pregnant women who have never had diabetes before but have high blood glucose (sugar) level during pregnancy are said to have Gestational Diabetes.

It is a condition in which women without previously diagnosed diabetes exhibit high blood glucose levels during pregnancy (especially 3rd trimester).

Gestational diabetes (GDM) affects about 3-10% of pregnancies. After delivery about 50-60% of women with GDM are found to develop Type 2 diabetes within 10-20 years.

Gestational diabetes is caused when insulin receptors do not function properly.
This is likely due to pregnancy related factors such as Human Placenta Lactogen (HPL) that interferes with susceptible insulin receptors(insulin resistance) ,thereby increasing blood sugar.

20131223-221817.jpg

Pregnancy itself is stressful and diabetogenic due to increased production of pregnancy hormones that are insulin antagonists e.g cortisol, placenta insulinase, estrogen, progesterone, etc.

Some identified risk factors for Gestational Diabetes includes:

Previous Gestational diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, Impaired fasting glucose.
Family history revealing a first degree relative with type 2.
Maternal age >35yrs
Overweight, obese or being severely obese increases risk.
Previous pregnancy resulting in a child with macrosomia.
Previous poor obstetric history.

Symptoms:

Typically, women with GDM exhibit little or NO symptoms (another good reason for universal screening) but some can demonstrate the well known diabetes symptoms such as:

increased thirst (polydipsia), increased urination (polyuria) , polyphagia, fatigue , nausea, vomiting etc.
Some also have urinary tract infections, history of repeated abortions, stillbirth(s), or delivery of oversized babies.

How Gestational Diabetes Affects You And Your Baby.

GDM poses a significant risk to mother and child. This risk is largely related to uncontrolled high blood glucose levels and its consequences.

Prompt recognition and care results in better control of these sugar levels and will reduce some of the risks considerably.

Fetal Risks:

Abortions, polyhydramnios-due to large placenta, fetal size and its sequelae.

Macrosomia (fetal weight>4kg), which in turn increase risk of instrumental deliveries (forceps,ventouse) or problems during vagina delivery(shoulder dystocia).
Preterm labour.

Intrauterine fetal death in the last 4wks due to ketosis, hypoglycemia, placenta insufficiency.

Neonatal morbidity and mortality due to respiratory distress syndrome, jaundice, hypoglycaemia,hyperviscosity,hypocalcemia.

Maternal Risks:

Pregnancy induced hypertension,Urinary tract infections and puerperal sepsis,obstructed labour,deficient lactation.

How can Gestational Diabetes be managed?

SIMPLY CONTROL YOUR BLOOD SUGAR

This can be achieved by using special meal plans (diabetic diet), scheduled physical activities (Exercise).

Dietary modifications are extremely important as a total of 1800calories/day and restriction of carbohydrate to 200g/day with less fat, more proteins and vitamins is advised.

Carbohydrate intake should be limited in the morning because of high blood glucose levels between 3-9am resulting from diurnal variant in plasma cortisol and glucagon levels.
Though,there are individual variations, endeavor to discuss your meal plan with your dietician and endocrinologist who will prescribe the appropriate insulin regimen.

The goal of treatment is to reduce blood sugar within normal limits thereby improving perinatal outcomes.

Frequent antenatal visits and foetal monitoring is strongly advised.


You don’t have to lose that pregnancy or suffer morbidities, though it might be true that after child birth you are free of gestational diabetes but while you still carry that baby———CONTROL YOUR DIABETES !!!

Ojo Oluwatosin

20131223-221804.jpg

It is generally advisable that all pregnant women be screened for gestational diabetes at health facilities.
For more information kindly send us an email thengdoc(at)gmail.com.

The World Diabetes Congress (Melbourne 2013)

The World Diabetes congress of the International Diabetes Federation took place at the Melbourne convention and exhibition centre, Melbourne, Australia from the 2nd to 6th of December, 2013.

The Mebourne Convention and Exhibition Center
 THE MELBOURNE EXHIBITION AND CONVENTION CENTRE

The world diabetes congress is a unique opportunity that brings together health care professionals, researchers, policy makers, people with diabetes, their families and carers.

Over 10,000 delegates were there to raise awareness on diabetes and its impact by convening at the global diabetes community to exchange research and best practices on diabetes prevention, treatment and management.

Registration Stand
PRE-REGISTRATION STAND

The international Diabetes Federation (I.D.F) is an umbrella body organization of over 200 national diabetes associations in over 160 countries. It represents the interests and the growing numbers of people with diabetes and those at risk. The Federation has been leading the global diabetes community since 1950. IDF’s mission is to promote diabetes care, prevention and a cure worldwide.

Diabetes
DIABETES 

The Sessions were inspiring with a lot of focus on mobile health and the use of social media as an important tool for diabetes awareness, prevention, peer support and care.

A lot of interactions, partnerships and social networking on adequate awareness, proper preventive measures and care aimed at improving the quality of lives of people living with diabetes was the centre piece of every session, symposium, presentation and even social activities .

IMG_0206
The Global Diabetes Online Communities (DOC) showcased at the World Diabetes Congress

We wish to appreciate CHEVRON NIGERIA for sponsoring 3 Final year Medical Students of the Olabisi Onabanjo University who were presenters at the World Diabetes Congress in Melbourne and volunteers  and the co-founder of The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community

CHEVRON NIGERIA
CHEVRON NIGERIA

In a system where most corporate organizations would rather support or endorse celebrities and established personalities and elites, it is noteworthy that by Chevron Nigeria extending its corporate and social responsibilities to student researchers it has reinforced its commitments to a brighter and greater future for Nigerians most especially for People living with Diabetes in Nigeria who were fully advocated for at the world diabetes congress.

IMG_20131118_125928
One of the Recipients of Chevron Nigeria’s Sponsorship for the International Diabetes Federation World Diabetes Congress

PHOTO SPEAKS

IMG_0296

The Great Britain DOC, Australia DOC And Nigeria DOC

IMG_0154

Elizabeth Rowley of T1 International, the Ugandan diabetes association President and Adejumo Olamide (Medical Student OOUTH)

DSC03490

Just before the MHealth symposium”WORKING TOGETHER TO DELIVER DIABETES CARE THROUGH MOBILE HEALTH”

DSC03499

IDF President Sir Micheal Hirst Giving the Presidential Address

DIABETES CONVERSATION MAPS

DiabetesConversation Maps

If you are a healthcare provider with interest in utilizing the IDF Diabetes Conversation Maps for educative purposes at your center kindly mail us at thengdoc@gmail.com

IMG_0109
Listening to words of wisdom from IDF Ambassador, Rights and Responsibilities of People living with diabetes with IDF Youth Leaders – Cajsa Lindberg

DSC01450
From Left to Right: Ms Arubuolawe Tosin (Medical Student OOUTH), Mrs Talabi (Talabi Diabetes Center), Dr Adeshina (Consultant diabetologist, Federal Medical Center Abeokuta), Dr. Chinenye (President, Diabetes Association of Nigeria), Chief Olumuyiwa Talabi (Founder and Patron of Talabi Diabetes Center), Ms Titilope AKinlabi (Medical Student OOUTH)

DSC01446
Diabetes Association of Nigeria President Dr Chinenye delivering his presentation at the world diabetes congress

IMG_0220
The Melbourne Declaration with Madam Bongi Ngema-Zuma the 1st Lady of South Africa and  Patron & Chairman of the Bongi Ngema-Zuma Foundation an organization dedicated to see a South Africa where diabetes ceases to be a killer due to lack of awareness. For more information about the activities of Her Excellency’s organization visit here

DSC01327
Cross section of delegates from Nigeria at the world diabetes congress.

IMG_0143
The 8 roles of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) for more information, visit the IDF website here

IMG_0120
Social Media has been agreed to be an important social support system for people living with diabetes and it is important for healthcare providers to join in the paradigm to provide technical support for the growing social media platforms used by people living with diabetes for regular communication.

IMG_0118
Cross Section of Participants and Presenters at the Internet, Social Media and community presentation (The Ozdoc and Dedoc)

IMG_0117

IMG_0172
People trying to get into the Social Media Presentation reflecting the desire of people to get involved in the communities that provide social support for people living with diabetes. For more information on the Global Diabetes online communities visit here

DSC01593
With Sir and Mrs Hirst

IMG_0144
THE IDF YOUTH LEADERS. More about the IDF Youth Leaders can be found here

DSC03531
The IDF Youth Leader President Keegan and Ashley Ng (Watch Ashley’s speech at the Diabetes Vic Corroboree here)

DSC03535

BajF890CEAAFJV_
At the Australia Diabetes Online #dmeetup (from social media to real life meeting)

DSC03502
At the Australia Diabetes Online and IDF youth leaders #dmeetup (from social media to real life meeting)

DSC03503
At the Australia Diabetes Online #dmeetup (from social media to real life meeting)

BaiLyJTCQAAdnPZ

I was about moving in for a social media symposium when Catherine Forbes asked me: “are you with @theNGdoc” i turned surprised, said yes and we hugged almost immediately. We were joined almost immediately by @Ashiekitty  and @diabetescounsel (From Social Media to Real life Meeting) the power of social media is awesome and its borderless nature brings out a global community of wonderful people united by #Diabetes.

 BamMAzWCAAA0dLt
SucreBlue, Renza, GBdoc and @hadejumo

IMG_0235

With Carrie Hetherington the winner of the best international contribution in the NGDoc world diabetes day essay. Her Essay write up can be found here

At the World Diabetes Foundation Stand

At the World Diabetes Foundation Stand

100 NIGERIAN FEMALE ADVOCATES IN 100 DAYS

100 NIGERIAN FEMALE ADVOCATES IN 100 DAYS

 blackspeakers

>In 2009, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) launched the Women and Diabetes Programme, to build global support for women living with diabetes.
There were an estimated 151 million women with diabetes in 2011 and this number is expected to rise to 275 million by 2030.
As a federation of over 200 MAs in over 160 countries, IDF is in a unique position to promote the women and diabetes agenda.

The Women and Diabetes Programme aims to:

Build the evidence base Raise global awareness and commitments Strengthen gender responsive health systems Empower women as key agents in the fight against diabetes.
The aims of the Women and Diabetes Programme are framed within the commitment IDF made to the UN Every Women Every Child initiative, which was launched by the UN Secretary General to put into action the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health:

“The International Diabetes Federation commits to increase recognition of the linkages between diabetes and related non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and women and children’s health, support the integration of diabetes into existing health systems and maternal and newborn child health initiatives, and empower girls and women to prevent diabetes in current and future generations”.

IDF WOMEN AND DIABETES PROGRAMME ACTIVITIES

Activities of the Women and Diabetes Programme fit within four broad categories:

Global awareness & advocacy: At the national and global levels, advocate for women and diabetes as a priority global health and development issue.

Building the evidence base: Epidemiological, qualitative and health systems research of the direct and indirect burden of diabetes on girls and women.

Best practice projects: Combine research and in-the-field interventions to establish models of diagnosis and care for women with diabetes and to improve their health outcomes.

Knowledge sharing: Organise and participate in side-events, meetings and conferences with other experts and stakeholders in the field of diabetes”.

Ife Barracks(1)Living with Diabetes is hard on women and its burden on women is unique because the disease can affect both mothers and their unborn children.
Diabetes can cause difficulties during pregnancy and delivery such as large sized babies, miscarriage or a baby born with birth defects. Women with diabetes are also more likely to have a heart attack, and at a younger age, than women without diabetes.

For women who do not currently have diabetes, pregnancy brings the risk of gestational diabetes. Based on recently announced diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes, it is estimated that gestational diabetes develops in 18 percent of all pregnancies but disappears when a pregnancy is over.

Women who have had gestational diabetes or have given birth to a baby weighting more than 9 pounds are at an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes later in life.

We at the Nigeria Diabetes Online Community believe in Female education and empowerment towards adequate Diabetes care and quality health delivery.
Hence, we plan to motivate 100 females who are ready to raise awareness about Diabetes in their communities.

So if you are a female or a female youth leader passionate about Diabetes Care and Prevention in Nigeria, enthusiastic about change in your community and you wish to create awareness about diabetes in Nigeria via social media thereby reducing its prevalence and the stigma associated with it.

Please feel free to contact us on thengdoc@gmail.com

References
International Diabetes Federation American Diabetes Association