Category Archives: Uncategorized

TAKING DIABETES TO HEART SURVEY

Taking Diabetes to Heart is a new multi-country study, developed by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) in partnership with Novo Nordisk, focused on Cardiovascular disease (CVD) awareness and knowledge among people living with type 2 diabetes. The purpose of the study is to help IDF better understand people living with type 2 diabetes.

There is a low data input from the African region and to avoid data misinterpretation, there is an extension of the deadline to accommodate more data especially from Africa.

We encourage everyone  Africans especially Nigerians living with type 2 diabetes to  take the survey.

It would only take a few minutes of your time.

Click here to take the survey

There are several ways that you can get involved with Taking Diabetes to Heart:
If you are living with type 2 diabetes, we encourage you to take the Taking Diabetes to Heart
survey here here
If you know someone with type 2 diabetes, please invite them to take the survey. If you are a clinician, kindly share to your network.

If you are active online and on social media, you can promote the survey to your network by
using the hashtag #TD2♥ or #T2DH

DIABULIMIA; The Deadly Eating Disorder Affecting Women With Diabetes

On August 4, 2017, Ms Megan Davidson, 27, commited suicide after battling with diabetes and diabulimia.

Megan was driven to suicide after her battle with her eating disorder and diabetes.

She died three days after she was discharged from mental health services after they thought she did not to have clinical depression and had full capacity according to the inquest.

On the morning of her death she had texted therapist, Renata Harris, saying: ‘Please make sure the emergency services find my body so my parents don’t have to.’

The 27-year-old’s body was found by police who had eventually been alerted by the therapist who received Ms Davison’s text message.

Ms Davison had previously tried to kill herself at the end of 2016 through an overdose.

The therapist decided the text had no ‘immediate implications’ and so did not tell anyone about it for almost an hour.

When police were contacted they went to Ms Davison’s home in Cheshunt, Hertfordshire, and found her body.

 

Megan is not alone,

The word diabulimia is a merger of the word diabetes and bulimia.

Though this word is not officially recognized, Diabulimia describes the situation where somebody deliberately and regularly reduces the amount of insulin they take due to concerns over their body weight and/or shape.

The American Diabetes Association indicates that 30-40 percent of female teenagers and young female adults with diabetes alter or skip insulin to control their weight. “If you have diabetes, then the risk of developing an eating disorder is about twice as likely than if you didn’t,” says Ronald Steingard, M.D., of Walden Behavioral Care in Waltham, MA and research consultant for Harris Center for Eating Disorders at Harvard University.

 

Individuals suffering from diabulimia intentionally misuse insulin for weight control, including:

  • Decreasing the prescribed dose of insulin
  • Omitting insulin entirely
  • Delaying the appropriate dose
  • Or, manipulating the insulin itself to render it inactive

 

On the long term, there is severe hypoglycemia and weight loss because the body would break down fats for energy since there is no insulin to help the tissues utilize glucose effectively.

Diabulimia is a mental health issue and health care providers should be able to recognize this and refer appropriately for psychological help if need be.

Although, this might not be popular among Nigerians, it just might  be because we do not have enough statistics and so many people with mental health issues do not regularly reach out for help.

Warning signs and symptoms of diabulimia

Emotional and behavioural

 

  • Secrecy about diabetes management
  • Increased neglect about diabetes management
  • Avoiding diabetes related appointments
  • Fear of low blood sugars
  • Fear that “insulin makes me fat”
  • Extreme increase or decrease in diet
  • Extreme anxiety about body image
  • Restricting certain food or food groups to lower insulin dosages
  • Avoids eating with family or in public
  • Discomfort testing/injecting in front of others
  • Overly strict food rules
  • Preoccupation with food, weight and/or calories
  • Excessive and/or rigid exercise
  • Increase in sleep pattern
  • Withdrawal from friends and/or family activities
  • Depression and/or anxiety
  • Infrequently filled prescriptions

 

Physical 

  • A1c of 9.0 or higher on a continuous basis
  • A1c inconsistent with meter readings
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Constant bouts of nausea and/or vomiting
  • Persistent thirst and frequent urination
  • Multiple DKA or near DKA episodes
  • Low sodium and/or potassium
  • Frequent bladder and/or yeast infections
  • Irregular or lack of menstruation
  • Deteriorating or blurry vision
  • Fatigue or lethargy
  • Dry hair and skin

It would be of immense help if

  • Psychological factors should always be considered, assessed and excluded in all episodes of DKA.
  • Sufficient time, resources and training must be in place to enable diabetes healthcare professionals to identify and support people with diabulimia effectively.

References

1) Colton, P. A., Olmsted, M. P., Daneman, D., Farquhar, J. C., Wong, H., Muskat, S., & Rodin, G. M. (2015). Eating disorders in girls and women with type 1 diabetes: a longitudinal study of prevalence, onset, remission, and recurrence. Diabetes care, 38(7), 1212-1217.

2) Svensson, M., Engström, I., & Åman, J. (2003). Higher drive for thinness in adolescent males with insulin‐dependent diabetes mellitus compared with healthy controls. Acta Paediatrica, 92(1), 114-117.

  1. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5554981/Patient-27-killed-asked-therapist-note-send-Dignitas.html
  2. Nationaleatingdisorders.org

Herbalist defrauds diabetes patient of 190 million for cure in Lagos

 

 

Diabetes is a condition that sadly has no cure but what is even more saddening is that there are people out there who are exploiting innocent people just in the bid to get them cure.

This was the case of Adeniyi Adewunmi, a self-acclaimed herbalist who allegedly swindled a businessman of 190 million claiming he’ll cure his diabetes.

The case was brought before an Igbosere Magistrates’ Court in Lagos where the accused, aged 43, is standing trial on a four count charge on conspiracy, fraud and stealing.

The Prosecutor, Friday Mameh said before court that the offences were commited between Feburary 2016 and January 2018.

“The accused and others still at large approached the complainant, one Mr Lawrence Akanbi, and told him that he is suffering from diabetes, asthma and spiritual attack”.

“The complainant believed because he was actually suffering from the ailments stated by the accused”.

“The accused used the opportunity to ask the complainant for money till the money amounted to N190m,” Mameh said.

The complainant, hoping for a cure, noticed his symptoms were rather getting worse and the accused arrested by the police.

The accused however denied the allegations.

The Magistrate, Mrs F.O. Botoku, granted him bail in the sum of N20m, with two sureties who must not be less than grade 16 in the civil service  in like sum.

The case was then adjourned the case until Feb. 12 for trial.

 

 

 

Source : The Punch Newspapers

Baby’s Coming; Coping With Diabetes in Pregnancy.

Before the discovery of insulin, the chances of having a baby with diabetes was really slim, but thanks to Banting and Best, the discovers of insulin, this century has seen better outcomes for mothers living with diabetes and their children. In Nigeria 1.7 percent of pregnant women have diabetes out of which 61 percent is gestational diabetes.

Pregnancy in itself is a diabetogenic state i.e pregnancy raises blood sugar levels in normal conditions . Diabetes may complicate pregnancy because a woman had diabetes before pregnancy  (pregestational diabetes which can be type 1 or type 2)or she developed diabetes during the course of her pregnancy (gestational diabetes). Gestational diabetes usually resolves few weeks after the baby is born. However, in about 60-70 percent of women, there is a recurrence in subsequent pregnancy.

 

The challenge

The body is more resistant to insulin during pregnancy to allow more glucose available to sustain the growth of the baby. This makes the body require more insulin production. In people with gestational diabetes, the pancreas can’t keep up with the production of insulin required and so the blood has excess glucose.

The main effects of diabetes in pregnancy is that it increases the risk of miscarriages in early pregnancy it increased risk of babies with congenital malformations e.g with cardiac problems . This is in people with poorly controlled diabetes. It is not uncommon to see people with diabetes developing hypertension and infections in pregnancy.

Too much glucose gets into the baby’s blood and causes accelerated growth of organs especially in the middle and late stages of pregnancy.  This results in big babies, too big to enter the birth canal and can cause the baby’s shoulder to be stuck (shoulder dystocia) making caesarean section necessary in some cases.

Shortly after birth, your baby may have low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) because his body will still be producing extra insulin in response to your excess glucose.

The baby is at risk of hypoglycemia immediately after birth because the baby was used to having excessive insulin action while in the womb. It is recommended that the mothers breast feed their babies shortly after birth to help reduce this.

There is also a a higher risk of having breathing problems because the lungs do not mature well enough and the baby might have neonatal jaundice.

Who should be more concerned?

Women above 35 years

People whose immediate relatives have diabetes

People who have had big babies (4.5kg and above) in the past.

People who weigh beyond 90kg or have a BMI above 30.

People who have had stillbirths without a known cause.

People who have had babies with birth defects

People with polycystic ovarian syndrome.

 

What to do?

Mums-to-be  need to check their sugar levels early in pregnancy during their first trimester.

A woman with diabetes or impaired blood sugar levels should consult with a doctor- both an obstetrician and a physician- even before the start of pregnancy. A dietician also plays a role of helping to maintain a healthy diet.

A diet of someone with gestational diabetes should be between 1500-2000 calories and there should be good combination of carbohydrates with protein and fats.  An HbA1c of between 4-6 is the usual target.

It is also important to take folic acid (5mg) before aiming at pregnancy for people at risk.

People living with diabetes before pregnancy would need to really monitor their sugar levels closely has pregnancy can alter their feeding patterns and they might require higher levels of insulin.

A woman who has had diabetes in previous pregnancy is advised to have yearly medical checks as she’s at risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future.

The pre-pregnancy states are very important. A woman with good glycemic control before pregnancy is more likely to have a better outcome.

 

BBC presenter apologises for ‘confused start’ due to hypoglycemia on air.

A BBC World service presenter, Alex Ritson was presenting at about 5 am in the Newsroom on Friday when his listeners heard him stumble on some of his words.

The presenter ,who has Type 1 diabetes has apologized for a “confused start”  saying he had a “low sugar attack” just as he went on air.

He was discussing about the Pope’s visit to Bangladesh when he suddenly was speaking slowly and difficult to understand

“I have Type 1 diabetes and I had a low sugar attack, a ‘hypo’, just as we came on air which caused me a little confusion in my opening sequences , so many apologies for that.”

A BBC spokeswoman said

“One of our presenters was a little unwell while on air this morning.”

”The presenter came back on air later in the programme and explained to listeners that they had Type 1 diabetes and were feeling better ”

So many listeners have commended him for that.

While so many of us think diabetes is just a problem of high blood sugar, it really is a struggle between high sugar levels and low sugar levels that result from insulin use. The patient is basically struggling to find a balance.

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) occurs in people with diabetes when their blood sugar goes beneath 4mmol/l (70mg/dl) but the value varies for most people.

Early signs and symptoms of diabetic hypoglycemia include:

Shakiness, Dizziness, Sweating, Hunger, Irritability or moodiness, Anxiety or nervousness, Headache

In more severe cases, there can be confusion, unconsciousness and even death.

To know more about hypoglycemia, you can check this

 Hypoglycemia training programme

Diabetes and Mental Health : What You Need To Know.

Today is World Mental Health Day.

According to the WHO, Health is a state of complete physical, social and mental wellbeing and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.

1 in 5 Nigerians have mental health issues.

So many people go through mental health issues unrecognized.

Nigeria is in dire need of mental health awareness as well as diabetes awareness as there are a lot of societal stigma attached to these conditions.

So many people would rather go to a spiritual home without consulting a physician for their mental health conditions.
It is not only those on the streets with tattered clothing that have mental health issues. So many people around us in our families or workplace might also be victims.

Mental health problems also coexist in about 25 percent of people with health challenges one of which is diabetes mellitus.

Why are people living with diabetes at risk of developing mental health problems?
Having depression raises your risk for onset of diabetes, just as having diabetes raises your risk for onset of depression. Depression can lead to poor lifestyle decisions, such as unhealthy eating, less exercise, smoking and weight gain — all of which are risk factors for diabetes.

Getting a diagnosis of diabetes in itself can lead to some emotional responses like anger, denial and fear which is normal in the initial stage of grief. However, this can be prolonged and then can lead to a myriad of problems.
Newly diagnosed people living witb diabetes can exhibit anger and wonder why they are diagnosed when other friends and relatives do not have the condition.

The stress involved in the entire lifestyle change of being careful with choice of food, regular blood sugar checks and having to take insulin can take a toll on a person.

Anxiety disorders, substance use disorders, eating disorders and post traumatic stress disorder are also common among people living with diabetes.

The financial and social burden of living with diabetes can also predispose to mental illness.
People with mental health challenge increases their risk of diabetes complications as they are more likely to be non-adherent to medications and self care.

It has been said that mental health state can affect treatment outcome of diabetes. For instance, Women with type 1 diabetes and eating disorders have poorer glycemic control, with higher rates of hospitalizations and retinopathy, neuropathy, and premature death compared with similarly aged women with type 1 diabetes without eating disorders.
The American Diabetes Association recommends that clinicians routinely screen diabetes patients for psychological problems; however, few diabetes clinics do provide those mental-health screenings
The World Health Organization estimates that diabetes will affect more than 350 million persons worldwide by 2030, with the number of persons affected more than doubling from the year 2000.

HOW TO PREVENT MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS IN PEOPLE LIVING WITH DIABETES
People living with diabetes need care, love and support from friends and family.
Learn coping mechanisms – diabetes management should include self care mechanisms. Exercise is said to be helpful in reducing stress and depression due to release of endorphins.
Find a support network or group.
Eating balanced diet.
Adequate sleep.
See a doctor for regular mental state examination and psychotherapy.

You can still win an all expense paid trip to a diabetes youth camp in Ghana . Click here

WIN AN ALL EXPENSE PAID TRIP TO DIABETES CAMP IN GHANA

There could be a lot of struggle for people living with diabetes especially when they’re going through it alone. There could be frustration for both the child and the care givers.
WHY SHOULD YOU ALLOW YOUR CHILD GO TO A DIABETES CAMP?
Camp experience is always exciting and it makes all the difference!

Diabetes camp provides fun and excitement while creating an avenue to learn more about how to manage diabetes. It allows children living with diabetes and those at risk of developing type 2 diabetes to learn in a safe and fun environment. It builds a community of people who grow together knowing they are not alone. It’s also a great opportunity for networking.

Camp is a lifeline for children with diabetes to develop the critical skills they need to manage the disease. Children get to be surrounded with people who understand their fears and frustrations; people who ‘get it’.
They learn about how to manage their diet, understand the symptoms and how their daily activities affect their health
It also helps build Confidence. It might be all you need to get your child motivated in a medically safe environment while also acquiring social skills and lifelong relationships (diabuddies!).
HOW TO WIN
Share a one minute video about your diabetes journey and stand a chance to go on an all expense paid trip to the West Africa Diabetes Youth Camp in Ghana from the 17th to 19th of November, 2017.

Send the video to our facebook page ‘NGDOC’.
Participants must be between ages 10-25 and must be able to attend the meeting.
Winners would be selected and reached.
For more information, Please send a mail to thengdoc@gmail.com

HEALTHY DIET DURING RAMADAAN

The month of Ramadaan is the 9th month of the Islamic calendar and regarded as a Holy month among the Muslim faithfuls. Allah (SWT ) in the Holy Quran made it compulsory for every Muslim of age with sound mind and body to fast from the Fajr(Dawn) to Maghreb(Sunset/Twilight)

Surah Al-Baqara, Verse 183-184:

يَا أَيُّهَا الَّذِينَ آمَنُوا كُتِبَ عَلَيْكُمُ الصِّيَامُ كَمَا كُتِبَ عَلَى الَّذِينَ مِن قَبْلِكُمْ لَعَلَّكُمْ تَتَّقُونَ
أَيَّامًا مَّعْدُودَاتٍ فَمَن كَانَ مِنكُم مَّرِيضًا أَوْ عَلَىٰ سَفَرٍ فَعِدَّةٌ مِّنْ أَيَّامٍ أُخَرَ وَعَلَى الَّذِينَ يُطِيقُونَهُ فِدْيَةٌ طَعَامُ مِسْكِينٍ فَمَن تَطَوَّعَ خَيْرًا فَهُوَ خَيْرٌ لَّهُ وَأَن تَصُومُوا خَيْرٌ لَّكُمْ إِن كُنتُمْ تَعْلَمُونَ

O you who believe! Observing As-Saum (the fasting) is prescribed for you as it was prescribed for those before you, that you may become Al-Muttaqun (the pious)
[Observing Saum (fasts)] for a fixed number of days, but if any of you is ill or on a journey, the same number (should be made up) from other days. And as for those who can fast with difficulty, (e.g. an old man, etc.), they have (a choice either to fast or) to feed a Miskin (poor person) (for every day).

image

But whoever does good of his own accord, it is better for him. And that you fast, it is better for you if only you know.
During
the fasting periods, no food or drink is consumed and thoughts as well as actions must be kept pure.

Muslims are required to eat the pre-dawn meal(Sahuur) and break their fast by sunset (Iftar ) with fruits and meal and may continue eating and drinking till the next Fajr.
Thus, it is important that good and wholesome meals be consumed in good proportions to maintain vitality.

It is common practice here in Nigeria, to often take “Swallows” (Okele) for Sahuur and lighter meals for Iftar since the Sahuur is to last through the day till  sunset. More often than not, such meals largely contain carbohydrates while other food classes are to a lesser amount.

The Sahuur should contain the food classes in right proportions to provide adequate energy that will last throughout the day and yet nutritious to the body without causing fatigue during the day.
Vegetables and fruits/natural fruit juices are a good complement.

It is advised that a cup of water at room temperature be taken because this will help mix with the already secreted gastric acid, overnight.

It is encouraged to break fast with fruits such as Dates or Oranges etc in concordance with the Sunnah of the Prophet Muhammad(SAW) and If none available, then water may be used. Dates are rich in sugars that are easily broken down and quickly absorbed into the body providing energy easily.

This is done prior to eating the Iftar meal, which will take longer time to digest. Carbonated drinks are discouraged because they liberate “gas” in the stomach which distends the stomach and can cause inconveniences during the Maghreb prayer that follows shortly afterwards.

Consumption of cold drinks at Iftar causes the gastric vessels to constrict and thus reduces blood supply to the stomach and this affects digestion negatively.
Rather, water a room temperature will be ideal, especially If you’ll be eating shortly after.

The choice of food ingredients should be aimed towards a balanced diet using fresh food items.

For vitamins and minerals, use fresh vegetables and fresh fruits and natural fruit juices, fresh whole grains. Avoid coconut because of its oil.

For dairy, low fat milk(skimmed milk).is good. Avoid whole milk, ice cream, cheese and full cream yoghurt.

For protein, lean meat, skinless chicken and turkey, moderate amount of prawns and crabs, beans and peas. Eggs for children and young adults and avoid “internal animal organs” and fried flesh(fish,meat, chicken or Turkey )etc

For carbohydrates, avoid fried potatoes and yam, pastries such as Doughnut, fried rice.

Avoid the use of butter and ghee in cooking. Avoid frying, rather you may boil or grill or bake the food items as applicable.

It is important to stay well hydrated during this fasting and avoiding large volumes of water at Sahuur will help attain this.
About 2-3 glasses of water Sahuur should be adequate when the meal contains juicy fruits like water melon.

Salty diets should be avoided and you should avoid putting much salt in your meal as it leads to dehydration.

With all that is said above, I hope I’ve been able to provide you with adequate information on eating healthy this Ramadaan. I wish you a healthy Ramadaan and I pray Allah accepts our efforts in this month as worship and make us of the successful ones. Aamiin.

Dr. Kazeem Adebowale D. is a blood donation advocate and also a pioneer of the “Heal the world foundation” and member of  “Curb cancer Initiative “.
He can be reached on qasimbilaalmusab@gmail.com.

MYTH 2: DIABETES IS A DEATH SENTENCE by Opawale Damilola

We recently started the discussion about Myths and Facts on Diabetes. If you missed the last post, kindly click here.

Today, we will continue on the discussion

MYTH 2: DIABETES IS A DEATH SENTENCE

FACT

Diabetes is not a death sentence. We established the last time that diabetes is a serious condition and is presently not curable. However, a diabetes diagnosis does not mean that you have been given an “expiry date”. It simply means you have to pay more attention to your health than before. 

There are several people who have lived with the disease for many years, some several decades and still living normal healthy lives without complications. 

We have a few testimonials from some of them:

Miss O.O, 17 years old – “I have been diabetic for 5 years. My living has been managed through regular use of Insulin, daily exercise, controlled diet, regular blood sugar checks and regular clinic visits. I am living well and happy”

Mrs. A.C. 52 year old diabetic diagnosed 9 years ago – “Basically what keeps me going is that I take my medications regularly, I choose my food carefully and I attend clinic regularly”

Mr. J.S – “When I was first diagnosed with the disease, I went online and read articles to educate myself. Diabetes education was a life saver for me. I have relationship with my doctors and that has been of great help”

 I will make attempts to outline a few things people living with diabetes must do to ensure that they live healthy and without complications

1. Have a positive attitude: Many people die not because the disease killed them but because they allowed the diagnosis to overwhelm them. Make up your mind to be happy, positive and active regardless of the fact that you have the disease

2. Get informed – Get information from authentic sources (Your doctors, support groups, books). This will help you understand better about the disease and how it should be managed. 

3. Drug Compliance: Take your medications religiously. Let your doctors prescribe drugs for you.

4. Know yourself – You need to know yourself to be able to recognize signs of when your sugar is going too low (hypoglycemia) or too high (hyperglycemia) and you need to know what to do at those times.

5. Diet Control: Contrary to the old teaching that diabetics have to eat only unripe fruits and vegetables. Studies have shown that diabetics can actually eat most of the food every other person eats, only that they need to eat them in right proportions. It is advisable to eat more of food that are high in fibre and low in calorie. Your doctor should educate you more about this.

6. Regular exercise: This also helps to control your blood sugar better, reduce weight, slows down ageing and improves heart function. However, rigorous exercise is not advised. Exercises recommended include brisk walking, swimming, cycling, Dancing, Playing court games, etc. 

7. Regular Clinic visit

8. Regular blood sugar checks

9. Avoid cigarette and alcohol consumption. These can worsen the disease.

10. Weight loss

11. Participate in support groups. 

People living with diabetes will benefit a lot from family support. 

In conclusion, Diabetes is a serious health condition which may have devastating consequences if not properly managed. 

People living with the disease must be ready to take responsibility for their health and they can live normal healthy lives. 

Please feel free to drop your questions and comments.

Feel free to send your diabetes related articles to thengdoc@gmail.com

Dr Oluwadamilola Opawale is a medical practitioner with interest in Public health and preventive medicine. She has had a stint of experience from the famous St. Nicholas hospital as a clinician.

She is also the President of IBuildAfrica Foundation, an NGO that reaches out to female adolescents, helping them maximize their potentials environment and background notwithstanding.

She has a passion to teach people how to stay healthy by imbibing healthy lifestyle and choices. 

Debunking Diabetes Myths. Part 1 by Damilola Opawale

Myth 1: Diabetes is caused when a person consumes too much sugary food and soft drinks

Fact:

The cause of Diabetes goes beyond the consumption of sugary meals. 

Diabetes is caused by a combination of hereditary (inherited) and lifestyle factors.

Let me break it down

Diabetes, presently incurable, is a disease condition that occurs when the body cannot use glucose (smallest form of sugar) well. A large portion of the food we eat is converted to glucose which is the main source of energy needed to fuel the body’s functions.

Glucose leaves our intestine and enters in the blood. From the blood, it is moved to the body cells where it is needed to produce energy or stored up for later use.

The substance (hormone) in the body that helps to move glucose from the blood to the cells is called INSULIN.

Insulin works like a key that opens the doors on the cells to allow glucose in. Without Insulin, glucose cannot enter the cells, so it stays in the blood.

Insulin is produced by an organ in the body called PANCREAS.

In some individuals, this insulin (the Key) is not produced at all or produced in insufficient amount due to some abnormalities in the genes of the persons. Hence the doors on the cells cannot be opened for glucose to enter. This is called Type 1 Diabetes which commonly affects Children and Teenagers.

In some other individuals, Insulin (the Key) is present, but the Key holes (called Receptors) on the cells are faulty, so they don’t respond when Insulin tries to open them to allow glucose in. 

This is called Type 2 Diabetes which commonly affects adults.

As a result of inability of glucose to enter the cells in these individuals, glucose level in the blood becomes higher than normal and can continue to rise if nothing is done. 

High levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood and low levels of glucose (sugar) in the cells are the causes of all the problems that Diabetes cause.

From what we have discussed above, it is obvious that eating a lot of sugar is not the main cause of Diabetes. 

However, Diabetics (people who have diabetes) have to be careful with what they eat since there is a problem with the process involved in the use of glucose.

Being overweight has been found to increase the risk for developing Type 2 Diabetes and a diet high in sugar can contribute to weight gain. For this reason, it is generally advisable for everyone to carefully regulate their consumption of high calorie food (food that ultimately lead to high sugar in the body). 

Feel free to drop your comments, contributions and share.

#KnowledgeIsKey#


Feel free to send your diabetes related articles to thengdoc@gmail.com.



Dr Oluwadamilola Opawale is a medical practitioner with interest in Public health and preventive medicine. She has had a stint of experience from the famous St. Nicholas hospital as a clinician.

She is also the President of IBuildAfrica Foundation, an NGO that reaches out to female adolescents, helping them maximize their potentials environment and background notwithstanding.

She has a passion to teach people how to stay healthy by imbibing healthy lifestyle and choices.