DIABETES AND PREGNANCY

Posted by The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community on December 23, 2013 under Diabetes Education, Information | 9 Comments to Read

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Pregnant women who have never had diabetes before but have high blood glucose (sugar) level during pregnancy are said to have Gestational Diabetes.

It is a condition in which women without previously diagnosed diabetes exhibit high blood glucose levels during pregnancy (especially 3rd trimester).

Gestational diabetes (GDM) affects about 3-10% of pregnancies. After delivery about 50-60% of women with GDM are found to develop Type 2 diabetes within 10-20 years.

Gestational diabetes is caused when insulin receptors do not function properly.
This is likely due to pregnancy related factors such as Human Placenta Lactogen (HPL) that interferes with susceptible insulin receptors(insulin resistance) ,thereby increasing blood sugar.

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Pregnancy itself is stressful and diabetogenic due to increased production of pregnancy hormones that are insulin antagonists e.g cortisol, placenta insulinase, estrogen, progesterone, etc.

Some identified risk factors for Gestational Diabetes includes:

Previous Gestational diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, Impaired fasting glucose.
Family history revealing a first degree relative with type 2.
Maternal age >35yrs
Overweight, obese or being severely obese increases risk.
Previous pregnancy resulting in a child with macrosomia.
Previous poor obstetric history.

Symptoms:

Typically, women with GDM exhibit little or NO symptoms (another good reason for universal screening) but some can demonstrate the well known diabetes symptoms such as:

increased thirst (polydipsia), increased urination (polyuria) , polyphagia, fatigue , nausea, vomiting etc.
Some also have urinary tract infections, history of repeated abortions, stillbirth(s), or delivery of oversized babies.

How Gestational Diabetes Affects You And Your Baby.

GDM poses a significant risk to mother and child. This risk is largely related to uncontrolled high blood glucose levels and its consequences.

Prompt recognition and care results in better control of these sugar levels and will reduce some of the risks considerably.

Fetal Risks:

Abortions, polyhydramnios-due to large placenta, fetal size and its sequelae.

Macrosomia (fetal weight>4kg), which in turn increase risk of instrumental deliveries (forceps,ventouse) or problems during vagina delivery(shoulder dystocia).
Preterm labour.

Intrauterine fetal death in the last 4wks due to ketosis, hypoglycemia, placenta insufficiency.

Neonatal morbidity and mortality due to respiratory distress syndrome, jaundice, hypoglycaemia,hyperviscosity,hypocalcemia.

Maternal Risks:

Pregnancy induced hypertension,Urinary tract infections and puerperal sepsis,obstructed labour,deficient lactation.

How can Gestational Diabetes be managed?

SIMPLY CONTROL YOUR BLOOD SUGAR

This can be achieved by using special meal plans (diabetic diet), scheduled physical activities (Exercise).

Dietary modifications are extremely important as a total of 1800calories/day and restriction of carbohydrate to 200g/day with less fat, more proteins and vitamins is advised.

Carbohydrate intake should be limited in the morning because of high blood glucose levels between 3-9am resulting from diurnal variant in plasma cortisol and glucagon levels.
Though,there are individual variations, endeavor to discuss your meal plan with your dietician and endocrinologist who will prescribe the appropriate insulin regimen.

The goal of treatment is to reduce blood sugar within normal limits thereby improving perinatal outcomes.

Frequent antenatal visits and foetal monitoring is strongly advised.


You don’t have to lose that pregnancy or suffer morbidities, though it might be true that after child birth you are free of gestational diabetes but while you still carry that baby———CONTROL YOUR DIABETES !!!

Ojo Oluwatosin

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It is generally advisable that all pregnant women be screened for gestational diabetes at health facilities.
For more information kindly send us an email thengdoc(at)gmail.com.

The Second African Diabetes Congress Yaounde 2014 “Diabetes: Challenges and Opportunities in Africa”

Posted by The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community on November 25, 2013 under Information, Research | 10 Comments to Read

The Second African Diabetes Congress  Yaounde 2014

“Diabetes: Challenges and Opportunities in Africa”


The Second African Diabetes Congress Yaounde-Cameroon:25th-28th February 2014 “Diabetes: Challenges and Opportunities in Africa”


The 2nd African Diabetes Congress will promote excellence in the field of diabetes.

The congress has been appropriately themed: “Diabetes: Challenges and opportunities in Africa”. The Congress will provide an ideal opportunity to cross fertilize with colleagues from Africa and mingle with international renowned experts in the field of diabetes.
The conference organizers are putting together an exciting scientific programme of the most recent diabetes evidence and best practice that will underpin the improvement in diabetes care, treatment and prevention adapted to the African region.
The congress will be held at the Palais des Congres Yaoundé -Cameroon from the 25th–28th February 2014. We look forward to welcoming you to Cameroon, Africa in Miniature!
More information can be gotten here

10 DIABETES FACTS

Posted by The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community on November 23, 2013 under Information | 11 Comments to Read

10 DIABETES FACTS

Here are 10 facts from the World Health Organization website featured on our twitter handle and Facebook Page.

1) There is an emerging global epidemic of diabetes that can be traced back to rapid increases in overweight, obesity and physical inactivity.
2) Total deaths from diabetes are projected to rise by more than 50% in the next 10 years. Most notably, they are projected to increase by over 80% in upper-middle income countries.
3) Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production and type 2 diabetes results from the body’s ineffective use of insulin.
4) Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1 diabetes, and accounts for around 90% of all diabetes worldwide.

5) Reports of type 2 diabetes in children – previously rare – have increased worldwide. In some countries, it accounts for almost half of newly diagnosed cases in children and adolescents.

6) A  third type of diabetes is gestational diabetes. This type is characterized by hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, which is first recognized during pregnancy.

7) In 2005, 1.1 million people died from diabetes. The full impact is much larger, because although people may live for years with diabetes, their cause of death is often recorded as heart diseases or kidney failure.

8) 80% of diabetes deaths are now occurring in low- and middle-income countries.

9) Lack of awareness about diabetes, combined with insufficient access to health services, can lead to complications such as blindness, amputation and kidney failure.

10) Diabetes can be prevented. Thirty minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity on most days and a healthy diet can drastically reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Image and Text Credit to World Health Organization; for more info visit here

HEALTH AND POLITICS

Posted by The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community on November 21, 2013 under Diabetes Education, Information, Society | 6 Comments to Read

HEALTH AND POLITICS

Health is the level of functional or metabolic efficiency of a living being. In humans, it is the general condition of a person’s mind and body, usually meaning to be free from illness, injury or pain.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defined health in its broader sense in 1946 as “a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.”
World Health Organization

World Health Organization

 

Health is of major concern to nations of the world. WHO and the member states strive hard to ensure this is achieved across board.  A major WHO goal is to improve equity in health, reduce health risks, promote healthy lifestyles and settings, and respond to the underlying determinants of health.
This among others are the goals expected to be followed by member states and organizations.

A meeting with Prof. Cees Th. Smit Sibinga was a real eye opener as we discussed the problems faced by developing nations and africa as a continent.
Prof Sibinga is a WHO expert involved in international short term consulting missions; medium and long term projects focused on the development of Transfusion Medicine in economically restricted countries in Asia, Eastern Europe, Central Asia, Africa, Western Pacific and the Middle East.
Prof. Cees Th. Smit Sibinga and I

Prof. Cees Th. Smit Sibinga and I

A lot has been invested in terms of resource on health in the continent with little impact and Africa being a toast of many investors has to be self motivated towards adequate care especially in health for her citizens.

Our focus of discussion centered around blood transfusion practices in Africa (His area of expertise) and diabetes (my passion ),we realized that so much needs to be done to step our health practices up to conform to international standards especially in Nigeria.

Nigeria is a large country with great prospect and promising health policies but implementation has been a major hindrance to quality health care delivery.
The World Health Organization’s activities deals directly with member nations and organizations hence whatever agreement signed at the World Health Assembly is binding on all member nations and as such must be implemented, likewise any feedback given by the member nations must reflect the true state of health affairs in the member country as that would be the blue print guiding WHO activity in such country.

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So what happens inbetween agreements, implementation and feedback: The Politics of Health;

So many questions ranging from if the Member nations especially developing countries abide by the  agreements signed at the World Health Assembly; if they give the true state of health in their respective countries as a feedback to WHO?
These questions are endless but from the few minutes interaction with Prof Sibinga i realized that the problems are not as cumbersome as thought and the solution is within reach.

Prof Sibinga said: “When you vote, you exercise your authority not just to choose your favorite candidate to govern your affairs for a particular period but also to represent your interest within that same period’
So, it is not just in us as individuals or as a nation to vote for personalities we love or adore but we also need to vote for policies and adequate representation especially in health care delivery across board.

It is imperative to note that once we are misrepresented at the international level as against the true state of health affairs or when policies end only on the papers then we need not scream isolation by the international community when in real truth the world can only help those willing to help themselves.
Interesting to note is that topmost on the agenda at this year’s world health assembly is Non Communicable diseases (click here) among which is Diabetes which has affected over 347million people worldwide (about 50% of those with diabetes are yet to be diagnosed; More than 80% of diabetes deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries; WHO projects that diabetes will be the 7th leading cause of death in 2030)

With all these knowledge at our fingertips it is important for all stake holders and health advocates to rise to the challenge of ensuring that proper health care policies and delivery are achieved at all levels of governance.
This is a clarion call to all health advocates especially at community level to also encourage the people to in addition to voting for personalities also consider policies that will make their health better and more secured.

We believe all governmental administrative structures from the community to national heads must be filled with people who stand for policies that will better the health and lives of the people
With this evolutionary mind set in view and in place we believe the African health care system will become more proactive.

 

 

HEALTHY HABITS TURNED LIFESTYLE: LESSONS TO BE LEARNT FROM GRONINGEN, THE NETHERLANDS.

Posted by The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community on November 20, 2013 under Information, NGDOC News, Research | 2 Comments to Read

HEALTHY HABITS TURNED LIFESTYLE: LESSONS TO BE LEARNT FROM GRONINGEN, THE NETHERLANDS

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Groningen is the main municipality as well as the capital city of the eponymous province in The Netherlands.

With a population of around 190,000, it is the largest city in the north of the Netherlands.
An ancient city, Groningen was the regional power of the northern Netherlands, a semi-independent city-state and member of the German Hanseatic League. Groningen is a university city: the University of Groningen and Hanze University of Applied Sciences each have about 25,000 students.

World Diabetes Day

With a background knowledge of Diabetes mellitus, or simply diabetes, being a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood sugar, either because the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or because cells do not respond to the insulin that is produced.

There are 3 main classifications of Diabetes Mellitus but for the purpose of this article we would major on Type 2 DM which makes up about 90% of cases of diabetes with the other 10% due primarily to diabetes mellitus type 1 and gestational diabetes.


Obesity is thought to be the primary cause of type 2 diabetes in people who are genetically predisposed to the disease. Type 2 diabetes is initially managed by increasing exercise and dietary modification.

Rates of type 2 diabetes have increased markedly over the last 50 years in parallel with obesity: As of 2010 there are approximately 285 million people with the disease compared to around 30 million in 1985.


Long-term complications from high blood sugar can include heart disease, strokes, diabetic retinopathy where eyesight is affected, kidney failure which may require dialysis, and poor circulation of limbs leading to amputations.
The acute complication of ketoacidosis, a feature of type 1 diabetes, is uncommon. However, non-ketotic hyperosmolar coma may occur

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But a proper diet and exercise are the foundations of diabetic care, with a greater amount of exercise yielding better results. A diabetic diet that promotes weight loss is important.
 Aerobic exercise leads to a decrease in HbA1c and improved insulin sensitivity. Resistance training is also useful and the combination of both types of exercise may be most effective.

Culturally appropriate education may help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar levels, and also prevent type 2 diabetes.
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Groningen has been called the “World Cycling City”, since 57% of journeys within the city are made by bicycle. The city is very much adapted to the wishes of those who want to get around without a car, as it has an extensive network of segregated cycle-paths, good public transport, and a large pedestrianized zone in the city centre.

The transformation of the historic centre into a pedestrian priority zone enables and invites walking and biking by making these active modes of transport comfortable, safe and enjoyable. These attributes are accomplished by applying the principle of “filtered permeability”.

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It means that the network configuration favours active transportation and selectively, “filters out” the car by reducing the number of streets that run through the centre. While certain streets are discontinuous for cars, they connect to a network of pedestrian and bike paths which permeate the entire centre. In addition, these paths go through public squares and open spaces increasing the enjoyment of the trip.

The logic of filtering a mode of transport is fully expressed in a comprehensive model for laying out neighbourhoods and districts – the Fused Grid.
In the Italian TV programme of investigative journalism “Report” appeared a short film, considering the use of bikes in Groningen a good practice to emulate in Italy.

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My experience at The International Student Congress of (bio)medical sciences in Groningen is a typical example of a healthy habit turned Lifestyle, I was thrilled by the fact that a city can turn cycling a good means of daily exercise into a lifestyle and I was thrilled seeing kids cycling around.
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Nigerian Medical Students at the ISCOMS (From Ukraine and Nigeria)
I believe other countries like Nigeria can emulate this great healthy habit, the hot West African weather might not allow for cycling all day long but evenings are great time to cycle. So in the future, road constructions should have bicycle lanes; there should be subsidized rates on bicycles and importation of bicycles to Nigeria must be encouraged.
All these efforts will go a long way in creating healthy lifestyles for Nigerians thereby preventing and managing type 2 diabetes among Nigerians. Also I will suggest the Nigerian Government should encourage student research exchanges through adequate funding and motivation as this is instrumental to economic and academic development, as this exposure is one not easily forgotten.

 

DIABETES CARE IN NIGERIA : THE WAY FORWARD

Posted by The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community on November 19, 2013 under Diabetes Education, Information, Society | 5 Comments to Read

DIABETES CARE IN NIGERIA : THE WAY FORWARD

On the 28th of April The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community and Diabeticare International in their usual style had a 1hour tweetchat that aimed at discussing the way forward in diabetes mellitus care in Nigeria.
There has been a progressive increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Nigeria and the burden is expected to increase even more. Considering this fact there is an urgent need to examine our healthcare systems, work on existing  programmes for persons with diabetes and effectively implement a process that facilitates accessibility to such.
This discussion that pulled interested participants from Nigeria and beyond was aimed at getting opinions and suggestions that are people oriented towards forging ahead in our clamour for quality health care services and delivery in Nigeria.

Five questions were thrown in the chat. Responses are summarized

1st QUESTION: On a scale of 1-10, how would you rate DM (Diabetes Mellitus) care in Nigeria and why?
Response Given;

Diabetic care in Nigeria is very poor because it is reactive rather than proactive. Prevention should be a key strategy

2nd QUESTION: how do you think NGOs can help with DM care and T2 (type2) DM prevention in your community?

Response Given;

Access to information & education is key. People can be empowered to be advocates for change in their own #diabetes communities
Education is key; insulin without education is like a car without a steering wheel and of course access to supplies is essential: affordability & availability are major issues in many countries, especially rural areas.
NGOs have more ability to influence education in a sustainable fashion and can help through health education programmes and the organisation of peer support groups for affected individuals
Crucial programs need to consider local customs & culture – involving #youth is essential!
Founders of t1 international and 100 campaign (international NGOs dedicated to T1DM CARE and promotion of access to insulin by all by 2022) our partners find it hard to believe that insulin is still so expensive – they believe insulin should be a human right.

3rd QUESTION: How can Health care providers enhance adequate support for people with D (diabetes)?

Response Given;
There should be more awareness and education provided in the communities
Pressure needs to be put on the pharmaceutical Companies – Diabetes is not a money making scheme
Connecting them to others. Empowering people to realize they can live a normal life, without limitations
By working together we can achieve this! We can learn from other movements. Strength in numbers & empowered groups
Individualising the treatment is key. Proper education of patients with Diabetes and making them partners in their own treatment

4th QUESTION: What role can the food, drinks and beverage industry play in DM care and prevention?

Response Given;
The food, drink and beverage industries need to be properly regulated!
Remember type1 is about a lack of insulin nothing to do with food types – watching food groups helps maintain better blood glucose control
Although food, drink & beverage industries do play a role in the lifestyles of people (& co morbidities), more sugar free alternatives of common beverages should be made available

5th QUESTION: In what ways can ‘WE’ increase community awareness on a large scale?

Response Given;
TV campaigns or radio jingles on Diabetes  happen to be important means of mass education and this can be  linked to a local community (health/ fitness) prevention event.
Empowering local role models with diabetes.
recognizing the basic symptoms and encouraging a healthy lifestyle for all
All forms of media (TV, Radio, Print, and Social) will help with the awareness. Currently very little is being done through them.

In lieu of this we at the Nigeria Diabetes Online Community hope to partner with individuals and organizations who see a need to propose and effect change in the Nigeria Healthcare system towards adequate Diabetes Care.
Thanks to all our Nigerian participants and our international friends who graced the meeting and also participated through great ideas and suggestions.

Our Emotional Meeting with Omolade a Nigerian Child with T1DM

Posted by The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community on November 17, 2013 under Information, NGDOC News, Society | Read the First Comment

From Left to Right (Dr Adekoya, Omolade, Her Mom)

From Left to Right (Dr Adekoya, Omolade, Her Mom)

 

Omolade is a 13 year old Nigerian Type 1 DM.
For her having Diabetes Mellitus wasn’t something she bargained for. Meeting with her was facilitated through our collaborative partnership with the Paediatric endocrinology department of the Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital (O.O.U.T.H), Sagamu, Ogun State, Nigeria.

Shagamu

 Dr. Mrs Fetuga (Consultant Peadiatric Endocrinologist and Omolade during one of her clinic sessions)

Diabetes mellitus type 1 (also known as type 1 diabetes, or T1DM; formerly insulin dependent diabetes or juvenile diabetes) is a form of diabetes mellitus that results from autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. The subsequent lack of insulin leads to increased blood and urine glucose.
The classical symptoms are frequent urination, increased thirst, increased hunger, and weight loss. (source wikipedia)

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Tears of joy flowed through her eyes as she went through our album of PWDs all over the world who identifies with her, understands how she feels and sees her as family.

Omolade is a girl filled with bitterness wondering why God had given her a disease she has to live with forever despite adequate explanation and support from her HCP.

Her hope was re-kindled knowing and practically seeing that she is not alone and she has thousands of children like her all over the world with T1DM, including adults.
This gives us an idea of a need for peer support for T1 PWDs in Nigeria where everyone can relate, interact and socialize.

Shagamu

 

Speaking with her mom about the financial implication on the family, she explains she spends N1,400 ($9) per vial and omolade uses 6 vials in a month making a total of ($54); this excludes the cost of glucometer and consumables.
This cost for a low income family in a developing country is burdensome and we aim through our partners to make this available thereby putting a smile on Omolara’s face and that of the family.

We have been in constant touch since our meeting on the 4th of April and we have seen the joy associated with having a family united by D.

We wish to use this medium to appreciate the Peadiatric Endocrinology unit of Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, Ogun State, Nigeria for their support.

For every Nigerian T1DM Child we are committed to giving them the support they deserve.

Here’s a call to HCPs, Health Care Givers, Diabetes Advocates and PWDs to identify with T1 children towards giving them the emotional support needed to encourage and motivate them towards a proper self management of D.

Do you know any Type 1 Nigerian Child please feel free to inform us.

Follow us on @theNGdoc or email us thengdoc@gmail.com

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) in Nigeria: Rare or not obvious?

Posted by The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community on November 11, 2013 under Diabetes Education, Information, Society | Read the First Comment

Hope

Type 1 diabetes is a type of Diabetes Mellitus characterized by loss of the insulin-producing beta cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas, leading to insulin deficiency, it can affect children or adults, but was traditionally termed “juvenile diabetes” because a majority of these diabetes cases were in children.

The true burden of T1DM is not really known, but a difference in the pattern and outcome of T1DM in Nigeria compared to other developed countries seems to be present.

Most DM screening data available is not population-based and is of limited value for making generalizations about Diabetes in the Nigerian Children.

According to Dr. Mrs Fetuga,Consultant Pediatric Endocrinologist at the Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital in South-West Nigeria who researched into the prevalence of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus cases at her center, only about 8 cases of T1DM have been seen with most presenting with Diabetic Ketoacidosis (a potentially life-threatening complication in people with diabetes, it happens predominantly in those with type 1 diabetes, but can occur in those with type 2 diabetes under certain circumstances. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response to which the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies that cause most of the symptoms and complications).

We wondered if T1DM is actually rare in Nigeria or our pattern of screening that excludes children vis a vis poor awareness of DM & its types among natives are responsible for the low data on T1DM.

She also raised concerns about poor knowledge and awareness of T1DM among mothers making it difficult for them to even explain what is wrong with the child when symptoms are demonstrated (loss of weight,frequent urination,increased thirst and increased hunger)these symptoms may develop rapidly (weeks or months) in type 1 diabetes.

Most parents also default follow-up after treatment with a high level of non-compliance to insulin use..

The International Diabetes Federation “Life for a Child” Programme was established in 2001 with support from the Australian Diabetes Council and HOPE worldwide and is an innovative and sustainable support programme in which individuals, families and organisations contribute monetary or in-kind donations to help children with diabetes in developing countries.

Here’s a call to HCP, Advocates, PWD to clamor for a more active community research into the epidemiology of T1DM in nigeria, passionate awareness, care and proper advocacy.

We at @theNGdoc are resolved towards committed advocacy for T1DM as well as the other types of DM and would appreciate any information on any child diagnosed of T1DM.

We are currently partnering with Elizabeth of T1international and the endocrinology unit of the pediatric department of Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching hospital towards creating adequate grass-root awareness and proper care for T1DM children in Nigeria.

With these collaborative efforts we hope towards promoting grass root awareness for T1DM in Nigeria and adequate care for those with it.
To reach us please follow us on twitter @theNGdoc or send us an email thengdoc@gmail.com

Lets Keep the Hope Alive.

Image Credit: everynigerianchild

WORLD DIABETES DAY CHAT NOVEMBER 14, 2013.

Posted by The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community on November 8, 2013 under Information, NGDOC News, Society | 2 Comments to Read

thengdoc

WORLD DIABETES DAY CHAT NOVEMBER 14, 2013.

According to the International Diabetes Federation, health in sub-Saharan Africa has been traditionally dominated by infectious disease, HIV/AIDS, and poverty. With rapid urbanisation, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) like diabetes are quickly becoming a new priority for health in the region. As urbanisation increases and the population ages, diabetes will pose an even greater threat.

In 2011, 14.7 million adults in the Africa Region are estimated to have diabetes, with a regional prevalence of 3.8%. The range of prevalence (%) figures between countries reflects the rapid transition communities in the region are facing.  The highest prevalence of diabetes in the Africa Region is in the island of Réunion (16.3 %), followed by Seychelles (12.4%), Botswana (11.1%) and Gabon (10.6%).  Some of Africa’s most populous countries also have the highest number of people with diabetes, with Nigeria having the largest number (3.0 million), followed by South Africa (1.9 million), Ethiopia (1.4 million), and Kenya (769,000).

Africa is currently the second largest mobile phone market after Asia, with more than 700 million mobile connections and a projected rise to almost 1 billion by 2016. More people on the continent have been introduced to the internet via mobile phones, and currently, Africa’s mobile data usage amounts to 14.85% of the total internet traffic – second only to Asia. In view of this, social media health platforms are rising  with social media becoming an integral part of modern society fostering a more intense, engaging and democratic discussion. Social media has moved beyond being a tool for young individuals to share their private lives (pictures, messages) to fostering serious discussion on technology, health and business.

The diabetes online community in Africa started up with Nigeria and South Africa joining in the world diabetes day 16hour twitter chat in 2012 organized by the Diabetes Social Media Advocacy in the United States of America, (http://diabetessocmed.com/). This chat featured about 6 countries, 449 participants, about 5 thousand Tweets, 6million impressions and reaching over 14 million people.

With Africa’s mobile subscriber base estimated to grow annually by a significant 30 percent, utilization of social media in establishing online health peer support communities in Nigeria and Africa has helped create awareness, educate and act as a great social media peer support.

 

WDD 2012 PARTICIPANTS

WDD 2012 PARTICIPANTS

 

To celebrate this year’s World Diabetes Day (WDD) on November 14, the Global Diabetes Communities spearheaded by The Diabetes Community Advocacy Foundation formerly Diabetes Social Media Advocacy is coordinating a 24 hour global twitter chat for diabetes awareness and to celebrate the world diabetes day.

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

This 24hour twitter chat which will involve diabetes organizations like the Australian Diabetes online community, Blueprint Barbados,100 Campaign, Great Britain Diabetes online community, diabetes daily , diabetes hand foundation and the Nigeria diabetes online community aims at achieving a global conversation on the state of diabetes care.

The Nigeria Diabetes online community will be moderating the chat from 3pm-4pm E.S.T (9pm-10pm local time) and we will be discussing the Theme: Diabetes Prevention and Care in Nigeria: the past, present and future.

This is a clarion call to all people living with diabetes, diabetes advocates, and health care providers, government health agencies to join the global diabetes movement and get their voices heard.

The Chat will run from 0:00hrs -24:00hrs E.S.T (5am Nov 14- 5am Nov 15 local time). Join the Nigeria diabetes online community from 8pm-9pm Nov 14 as we discuss issues pertaining to diabetes in the continent.

Adejumo Olamide Hakeem

 

 

 

Blue Friday Personality of the Week

Posted by The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community on November 7, 2013 under Information, NGDOC News, Society | Be the First to Comment

BLUE FRIDAY PERSONALITY OF THE WEEK

In November 2010, Cherise Shockley cordinator of @DiabetesSocMed founded the Blue Fridays Initiative to spread the word about World Diabetes Day and Diabetes Awareness Month.

Diabetes is more than just a national issue; it is a world epidemic. Blue Fridays brings the global diabetes community together to raise awareness and celebrate World Diabetes Day.

Cherise  received several emails and Facebook messages asking her to extend Blue Fridays and in december 2011, she honored the request she received from many people throughout the diabetes community by asking everyone to wear something blue every Friday.

Inspired by the Cherise’s #bluefriday success @hadejumo started the blue friday personality of the week #bluefridaypow where he aimed at showcasing and profiling people every friday who are dedicated to creating diabetes awareness as a way of promoting diabetes awareness, blue friday and reducing the stigma associated with diabetes in nigeria and africa in general.

This program which featured so many people (PW/OD) was generally accepted by nigerians and henceforth will be continued (from the 14th of March, 2013) by @theNGdoc and @diabeticare.

If you are a PWD,a Diabetes advocate or an interested individual and you want to be featured as our #bluefridaypow (Blue Friday Personality of the week) send your Your Name, when diagnosed if a PWD if not skip, your activities, profession, works (blogs, research or articles on D) or what you do generally!

Should you have any quotes or sites we can quote from, we’d gladly do that.

Send a picture of you in blue and with answers to the questions above to thengdoc@gmail.com.

Expect a responce from us within 3 working days.

More info on WDD Blue Fridays Initiative bluefridays – Diabetes Social Media Advocacy can be found here
Thank you and keep the awareness alive.