Category Archives: Information

SPARE A ROSE AND SAVE A CHILD

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Image credit @ConnectInMotion

Valentine is a season of love but for children around the world with type 1 diabetes, lack of access to insulin is
the most common cause of death.

And in some areas of the world, most children with diabetes can expect to live less than a year past their diagnosis date – if they’re diagnosed at all.

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This Valentine’s day, our community can help change that.

Under the Spare a Rose, Save a Child campaign, (a Diabetes Hand Foundation Campaign) we will help create awareness and gain donations and awareness for Life for a Child, an International Diabetes Federation program aiming to fund the continuous medical care, access to supplies and medication, and diabetes education that children in developing nations need to stay alive.

Spare a Rose, Save a Child
is simple:

You buy one less rose this Valentine’s Day and share the value of that flower
with a child with diabetes in the developing world.

Your loved one at home still receives flowers and you both give help to a child with diabetes who desperately
needs it.

A rose is about 5 bucks, for that one rose, IDF can give a child one month of life.

A dozen roses, a year of life for a child with diabetes. You can watch the video of how Lives have been saved by the International Diabetes Federation here

Click here to donate

Please note that all funds goes directly to the International Diabetes Federation Life For A Child Program.
Thank you.

For more information contact us on thengdoc@gmail.com

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DIABETES AND PREGNANCY

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Pregnant women who have never had diabetes before but have high blood glucose (sugar) level during pregnancy are said to have Gestational Diabetes.

It is a condition in which women without previously diagnosed diabetes exhibit high blood glucose levels during pregnancy (especially 3rd trimester).

Gestational diabetes (GDM) affects about 3-10% of pregnancies. After delivery about 50-60% of women with GDM are found to develop Type 2 diabetes within 10-20 years.

Gestational diabetes is caused when insulin receptors do not function properly.
This is likely due to pregnancy related factors such as Human Placenta Lactogen (HPL) that interferes with susceptible insulin receptors(insulin resistance) ,thereby increasing blood sugar.

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Pregnancy itself is stressful and diabetogenic due to increased production of pregnancy hormones that are insulin antagonists e.g cortisol, placenta insulinase, estrogen, progesterone, etc.

Some identified risk factors for Gestational Diabetes includes:

Previous Gestational diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, Impaired fasting glucose.
Family history revealing a first degree relative with type 2.
Maternal age >35yrs
Overweight, obese or being severely obese increases risk.
Previous pregnancy resulting in a child with macrosomia.
Previous poor obstetric history.

Symptoms:

Typically, women with GDM exhibit little or NO symptoms (another good reason for universal screening) but some can demonstrate the well known diabetes symptoms such as:

increased thirst (polydipsia), increased urination (polyuria) , polyphagia, fatigue , nausea, vomiting etc.
Some also have urinary tract infections, history of repeated abortions, stillbirth(s), or delivery of oversized babies.

How Gestational Diabetes Affects You And Your Baby.

GDM poses a significant risk to mother and child. This risk is largely related to uncontrolled high blood glucose levels and its consequences.

Prompt recognition and care results in better control of these sugar levels and will reduce some of the risks considerably.

Fetal Risks:

Abortions, polyhydramnios-due to large placenta, fetal size and its sequelae.

Macrosomia (fetal weight>4kg), which in turn increase risk of instrumental deliveries (forceps,ventouse) or problems during vagina delivery(shoulder dystocia).
Preterm labour.

Intrauterine fetal death in the last 4wks due to ketosis, hypoglycemia, placenta insufficiency.

Neonatal morbidity and mortality due to respiratory distress syndrome, jaundice, hypoglycaemia,hyperviscosity,hypocalcemia.

Maternal Risks:

Pregnancy induced hypertension,Urinary tract infections and puerperal sepsis,obstructed labour,deficient lactation.

How can Gestational Diabetes be managed?

SIMPLY CONTROL YOUR BLOOD SUGAR

This can be achieved by using special meal plans (diabetic diet), scheduled physical activities (Exercise).

Dietary modifications are extremely important as a total of 1800calories/day and restriction of carbohydrate to 200g/day with less fat, more proteins and vitamins is advised.

Carbohydrate intake should be limited in the morning because of high blood glucose levels between 3-9am resulting from diurnal variant in plasma cortisol and glucagon levels.
Though,there are individual variations, endeavor to discuss your meal plan with your dietician and endocrinologist who will prescribe the appropriate insulin regimen.

The goal of treatment is to reduce blood sugar within normal limits thereby improving perinatal outcomes.

Frequent antenatal visits and foetal monitoring is strongly advised.


You don’t have to lose that pregnancy or suffer morbidities, though it might be true that after child birth you are free of gestational diabetes but while you still carry that baby———CONTROL YOUR DIABETES !!!

Ojo Oluwatosin

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It is generally advisable that all pregnant women be screened for gestational diabetes at health facilities.
For more information kindly send us an email thengdoc(at)gmail.com.

The Second African Diabetes Congress Yaounde 2014 “Diabetes: Challenges and Opportunities in Africa”

The Second African Diabetes Congress  Yaounde 2014

“Diabetes: Challenges and Opportunities in Africa”


The Second African Diabetes Congress Yaounde-Cameroon:25th-28th February 2014 “Diabetes: Challenges and Opportunities in Africa”


The 2nd African Diabetes Congress will promote excellence in the field of diabetes.

The congress has been appropriately themed: “Diabetes: Challenges and opportunities in Africa”. The Congress will provide an ideal opportunity to cross fertilize with colleagues from Africa and mingle with international renowned experts in the field of diabetes.
The conference organizers are putting together an exciting scientific programme of the most recent diabetes evidence and best practice that will underpin the improvement in diabetes care, treatment and prevention adapted to the African region.
The congress will be held at the Palais des Congres Yaoundé -Cameroon from the 25th–28th February 2014. We look forward to welcoming you to Cameroon, Africa in Miniature!
More information can be gotten here

10 DIABETES FACTS

10 DIABETES FACTS

Here are 10 facts from the World Health Organization website featured on our twitter handle and Facebook Page.

1) There is an emerging global epidemic of diabetes that can be traced back to rapid increases in overweight, obesity and physical inactivity.
2) Total deaths from diabetes are projected to rise by more than 50% in the next 10 years. Most notably, they are projected to increase by over 80% in upper-middle income countries.
3) Type 1 diabetes is characterized by a lack of insulin production and type 2 diabetes results from the body’s ineffective use of insulin.
4) Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1 diabetes, and accounts for around 90% of all diabetes worldwide.

5) Reports of type 2 diabetes in children – previously rare – have increased worldwide. In some countries, it accounts for almost half of newly diagnosed cases in children and adolescents.

6) A  third type of diabetes is gestational diabetes. This type is characterized by hyperglycaemia, or raised blood sugar, which is first recognized during pregnancy.

7) In 2005, 1.1 million people died from diabetes. The full impact is much larger, because although people may live for years with diabetes, their cause of death is often recorded as heart diseases or kidney failure.

8) 80% of diabetes deaths are now occurring in low- and middle-income countries.

9) Lack of awareness about diabetes, combined with insufficient access to health services, can lead to complications such as blindness, amputation and kidney failure.

10) Diabetes can be prevented. Thirty minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity on most days and a healthy diet can drastically reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Image and Text Credit to World Health Organization; for more info visit here

HEALTH AND POLITICS

HEALTH AND POLITICS

Health is the level of functional or metabolic efficiency of a living being. In humans, it is the general condition of a person’s mind and body, usually meaning to be free from illness, injury or pain.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defined health in its broader sense in 1946 as “a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.”
World Health Organization
World Health Organization

 

Health is of major concern to nations of the world. WHO and the member states strive hard to ensure this is achieved across board.  A major WHO goal is to improve equity in health, reduce health risks, promote healthy lifestyles and settings, and respond to the underlying determinants of health.
This among others are the goals expected to be followed by member states and organizations.

A meeting with Prof. Cees Th. Smit Sibinga was a real eye opener as we discussed the problems faced by developing nations and africa as a continent.
Prof Sibinga is a WHO expert involved in international short term consulting missions; medium and long term projects focused on the development of Transfusion Medicine in economically restricted countries in Asia, Eastern Europe, Central Asia, Africa, Western Pacific and the Middle East.
Prof. Cees Th. Smit Sibinga and I
Prof. Cees Th. Smit Sibinga and I

A lot has been invested in terms of resource on health in the continent with little impact and Africa being a toast of many investors has to be self motivated towards adequate care especially in health for her citizens.

Our focus of discussion centered around blood transfusion practices in Africa (His area of expertise) and diabetes (my passion ),we realized that so much needs to be done to step our health practices up to conform to international standards especially in Nigeria.

Nigeria is a large country with great prospect and promising health policies but implementation has been a major hindrance to quality health care delivery.
The World Health Organization’s activities deals directly with member nations and organizations hence whatever agreement signed at the World Health Assembly is binding on all member nations and as such must be implemented, likewise any feedback given by the member nations must reflect the true state of health affairs in the member country as that would be the blue print guiding WHO activity in such country.

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So what happens inbetween agreements, implementation and feedback: The Politics of Health;

So many questions ranging from if the Member nations especially developing countries abide by the  agreements signed at the World Health Assembly; if they give the true state of health in their respective countries as a feedback to WHO?
These questions are endless but from the few minutes interaction with Prof Sibinga i realized that the problems are not as cumbersome as thought and the solution is within reach.

Prof Sibinga said: “When you vote, you exercise your authority not just to choose your favorite candidate to govern your affairs for a particular period but also to represent your interest within that same period’
So, it is not just in us as individuals or as a nation to vote for personalities we love or adore but we also need to vote for policies and adequate representation especially in health care delivery across board.

It is imperative to note that once we are misrepresented at the international level as against the true state of health affairs or when policies end only on the papers then we need not scream isolation by the international community when in real truth the world can only help those willing to help themselves.
Interesting to note is that topmost on the agenda at this year’s world health assembly is Non Communicable diseases (click here) among which is Diabetes which has affected over 347million people worldwide (about 50% of those with diabetes are yet to be diagnosed; More than 80% of diabetes deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries; WHO projects that diabetes will be the 7th leading cause of death in 2030)

With all these knowledge at our fingertips it is important for all stake holders and health advocates to rise to the challenge of ensuring that proper health care policies and delivery are achieved at all levels of governance.
This is a clarion call to all health advocates especially at community level to also encourage the people to in addition to voting for personalities also consider policies that will make their health better and more secured.

We believe all governmental administrative structures from the community to national heads must be filled with people who stand for policies that will better the health and lives of the people
With this evolutionary mind set in view and in place we believe the African health care system will become more proactive.