Category Archives: Information

New study links antibiotic use to increased risk of Type 2 Diabetes

According to a new study published August 27, 2015 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism by Kristian Hallundback Mikkelsen, MD, a PhD student at the Center for Diabetes Research, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen (Hellerup, Denmark) and colleagues;  there are suggestions of a clear link between Type 2 diabetes mellitus and the number of times a patient has been prescribed antibiotics.

Data from three national Danish registries revealed that prior exposure to antibiotics was associated with a 53% increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (170,404 patients with Type 2 diabetes and 1.3 million who did not have the disease).

The finding could mean that antibiotics play a direct causal role in type 2 diabetes or that people with as-yet-undiagnosed diabetes may have a greater risk for infection and therefore are more likely to use antibiotics.

“Both interpretations are supported by the literature and could contribute to the observed associations,” Dr Mikkelsen told Medscape Medical News.

They found the risk of getting diabetes was highest in those given antibiotics that are effective against a narrow range of bacteria.

Study author Dr Kristian Mikkelsen said: “In our research we found people who have Type 2 diabetes used significantly more antibiotics up to 15 years prior to diagnosis compared to healthy controls.”

Dr Mikkelsen, of Gentofte Hospital in Hellerup, Denmark, also said more research was needed because the findings did not prove that the drugs trigger diabetes.

Antibiotics, the main way of treating infections for more than 60 years, can alter the bugs living in the gut.
Some of these bugs may contribute to the impaired ability of people living with diabetes to metabolise sugar.

But an alternative explanation could be that people with undiagnosed diabetes may be more prone to infection and therefore use more antibiotics.

Clinically, the findings add a new argument to the current movement toward less frequent and more judicious use of antibiotics.

“Microbiologists frequently remind clinicians not to overuse antibiotics because of the growing resistance problems and inadequate development of new antibiotics. If it appears that antibiotics also have long-term and potentially negative metabolic adverse effects, it of course puts additional weight behind a strict policy for antibiotics prescribing and selling,” he noted.

Sources: Daily Express UK; Medscape News.

The International Diabetes Federation launches the World Diabetes Day Guide

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The International Diabetes Federation launches the World Diabetes Day Guide and Infogram.

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is an umbrella organisation of over 230 national diabetes associations in 170 countries and territories.

It represents the interests of the growing number of people with diabetes and those at risk.

The Federation has been leading the global diabetes community since 1950 and it’s activities aim to influence policy, increase public awareness and encourage health improvement, promote the exchange of high-quality information about diabetes, and provide education for people with diabetes and their healthcare providers.

IDF is associated with the Department of Public Information of the United Nations and is in official relations with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO).

We are delighted to announce that World Health Day 2016 will be dedicated to diabetes.

According to the IDF website, this announcement was made public by Dr Etienne Krug, WHO Director of NCD Prevention and Control, at the launch of the World Diabetes Day campaign during the World Health Assembly, on May 19.

The campaign will focus on healthy eating  as a key factor in the fight against diabetes and a  cornerstone of global health and sustainable  development.

Healthy eating:
a) Can help prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes
b) Is an important part of the effective management of all types of diabetes to help avoid complications

Two questions inform campaign activities:
a) How to ensure access to healthy food?
b) Which healthy foods  will help prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes and which healthy foods will help effectively manage all types of diabetes?

While WDD 2015 primarily addresses key opinion leaders, the campaign success also relies on the stakeholders of the global diabetes community.

Join in the campaign by downloading the guide and effectively creating the much needed awareness in your community.

Visit The World Diabetes Day official website for more information.
To download the World Diabetes Day Guide visit here

Monologues of a Diabetic (Series 1)

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I am Olayeye Olumuyiwa Ayokunle. I am a DIABETIC living in Lagos State, Nigeria. I am in my early 40’s &  i run a small business.

I was diagnosed with diabetes in my early 20’s. That means i have been managing diabetes for almost 20 years now.

I am married & have a 2 year old daughter. (She is my world) These are my monologues from a diabetic point of view.
Hopefully, you will learn one or two things & also keep you entertained.

Before i go into my monologues, permit me to blow your mind a bit with this question: How many people have diabetes in Nigeria? “. 

Now as a Nigerian, our data gathering techniques or process is not top notch but from the one I could gather from the World Health Organization people living with diabetes in Nigeria are estimated to be 1,707,000. i.e  One million, seven hundred & seven thousand people & by 2030 it is expected to rise to 4,835,000 i.e Four million Eight hundred & thirty five thousand people.

As observed this is exponential!
Now that is the known people.

(The International Diabetes Federation latest figure on Nigeria (3.9 million diagnosed and about undiagnosed 1.8 million cases) can be found here)

In Africa, especially Nigeria, people seldom share their health challenges except when absolutely necessary.

And why is this? Obviously the stigma… I was a victim of this too.
My diabetic status was not something i was willing to let anyone know. It was a closely guarded secret.

So back to our statistics, a lot of people are living with diabetes, they don’t tell, they simply keep mum.

Some are diabetic, they just don’t care as long as they are able to go about their everyday chores.

Some are diabetic & they don’t know yet because Nigeria is a place where a large percentage seldom go for a full medical check up.

An average Nigerian can go for as long as 8 to 9 years without doing a full medical checkup & a large percentage that do, do simply because it was absolutely necessary. 

So putting all these into perspective, i can confidently say the unknown diabetic case in Nigeria is up to one million people. So that is to say about 2.5 million people are living with diabetes in Nigeria.

A whooping 2.5 million in Nigeria are diabetics.

Stay tuned… To be continued.

The monologues of a diabetic is a series by Mr Muyiwa Olayeye and he can be reached on muyiwaolayeye@yahoo.com  or jesuoseunti@gmail.com

Disclaimer: Views expressed are solely the author’s.

Are you living with Diabetes or you know anyone living with diabetes that might wish to share their experiences with us. Kindly contact us on thengdoc@gmail.com.

Together we can stop the stigmatization

MEET INSPIRING PEOPLE LIVING WITH DIABETES

Living with Diabetes in Africa could be a bit challenging especially when one is in Isolation.

Which is why we are coming up with list of people living with diabetes globally that didn’t allow Diabetes affect who they are.

They have proved beyond reasonable doubt through their dedication and exploits that #Diabetes can’t stop us irrespective of our age, race, social status and nationality.

PEOPLE LIVING WITH DIABETES THAT WILL INSPIRE YOU

Mohammad Al-Bahar (Kuwait)

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My name is Mohammad, I’m 31 years old, I was diagnosed with diabetes when I was 2 years old (DOD 25 May 1986).

I have graduated from College of Business Administration in 2006, majored in Management Information System / IT, pursued a professional insurance diploma from the Chartered Insurance Institute based in the United Kingdom, used to work in insurance for 5 years and now working in Land Development (Kuwait Direct Investment Promotion Authority).

I’m a Young Leader in Diabetes representing Kuwait and the MENA Region, my project is titled: “Diabetes Ambassadors Program”, which is mainly about spreading awareness about Type 1 Diabetes in Schools, colleges, universities as well as the workplace, to correct the misconception, fight discrimination and share our experience as diabetics about diabetes and how it can be managed and controlled.

My life with diabetes wasn’t easy, I had my highs and lows, in 2011 I went into a hypoglycemia coma, that experience lead me to take a stand and take good care of my health, I have learned carb counting and I’m currently using an insulin pump, I do exercise, extreme sports and have traveled the world.

I have considered diabetes as my friend … realizing that I’m not alone with diabetes, I have met an amazing group of people from all around the world diagnosed with diabetes, and we have learned from each other experiences that together we can control diabetes and live a healthy and a productive life just like everyone else, all we have to do is take certain measures into consideration.

Cherise Shockley (United States of America)

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I was diagnosed with Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults in June 2004.

I have been an invited speaker and presenter on the topic of diabetes and social media. I founded Diabetes Social Media Advocacy (DSMA) to empower, support and connect people affected by diabetes.

Through DSMA’s Twitter chats and Blog Talk Radio shows we are able to focus on life with diabetes and at as a pillar that brings the diabetes online community together.

Diabetes is a frustrating condition; it’s up and down, but what helps me stay sane is a lot of prayer and my faith.  If I could offer one piece of advice, please do not allow diabetes to steal your joy.

Life is too precious to focus on the inconsistency of this condition; it’s not your fault. 

Elizabeth Rowley (United Kingdom)

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My name is Elizabeth Rowley. I was born in the United States and have lived with type 1 diabetes for over 20 years.

There are a lot of things that make living with diabetes a challenge, particularly because people with Type 1 diabetes never get a break. It never goes away. We constantly have to test blood sugar, calculate carbohydrates, estimate insulin levels, factor in exercise or activity to avoid high or low blood sugars – not to mention the emotional and psychological effects! This is all exacerbated for someone who is struggling to access their insulin, diabetes supplies, or lacks proper diabetes education – a subject I care deeply about.

I moved to London in 2011 to complete my Master’s degree in International Development and Humanitarian Emergencies at the London School of Economics and Political Science. During my course of study I gained the skills and confidence to set up T1International, a small charity that aims to raise awareness and make sure that everyone with type 1 diabetes has access to everything they need to survive and achieve their dreams. We have come a long way and, along with everyone that lives with or has a connection to type 1 diabetes, I know we can make a difference and address the fact that many people with type 1 diabetes are fighting for their lives daily due to lack of supplies, care, treatment, and education.

Living with diabetes has been a struggle for me personally, but I have done my best not to let it stop me from doing the things I want in life. It has given me a lot of determination and I am confident that by working together we can find creative and sustainable solutions to the complex problems faced by people with diabetes.

Yemurai Sammantha Machirori (Zimbabwe)

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Yemurai Sammantha Machirori

My name is Yemurai Sammantha Machirori, a 22 year old lady from Zimbabwe.
I was born on 31 October 1992 and I am currently studying tourism and hospitality management at one of our local colleges.

I was diagnosed with type one diabetes just a month before my 12th birthday, in September 2004. Accepting that I had diabetes was not much of a problem in my first two years of diagnosis, maybe because I was in an environment where I knew that everyone cared about me.

However, things started to change as I started senior school. Meeting new people and trying to fit into a new environment was difficult for both me and my diabetes and hence making my senior school years the worst of my diabetic life.

As I started college in 2012, I started working with my member association more, meeting more young people with diabetes and realising that diabetes was not a condition that only affected “old people”, something that I had been made to believe in senior school by the ladies I learnt with.

“I would like to help other children like me”… is what I told my mum on the night that I was diagnosed with diabetes and I was pushed a step towards my dream as I was approached by my member association to represent Zimbabwe as a young leader in diabetes in Melbourne (2012).
This gesture helped me a lot as I now appreciate my condition even more, and also determined to help other youths with diabetes in my country.

Ramadan Healthy Mix

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The Ramadan Healthy Mix ended with an increased awareness and sensitization about the need for fasting muslims to eat healthy during the month of Ramadan.

Gift was given to the participant who was able to show her healthy Ramadan diet.

The overall objective of this hashtag is to encourage muslims to fast healthy as against the popular notion of eating heavy and predominantly carbohydrates during fasting.

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The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community had about 71 Participants in the #RamadanHealthyMix who created about 489,128 Impressions on Twitter.

A huge thanks to all our partners.

@kayodeolowu multiple international creative arts award winner and partner #RamadanHealthyMix. He can be reached on www.kayodeolowu.com

Huntella:

Huntella is a multiple winning online wholesale and retail outfit and partner #RamadanHealthyMix. They can be reached on www.huntella.net

1one4.com is the hub of Muslims, from Nigeria to the world. With its wide range of content aiming not only to inform muslims on issues that affect them, but also educate all people, muslim or non-muslim alike.

NGDOC partners with Ogun State Government

 

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The 21st of May was a memorable day for the students of Ogun State as the ministry of health launched its School Health Cadet program.

The School Health Cadets involves cross section of secondary school students from across Ogun State.
Their responsibility is to create a health conscious Community through their various activities in their schools and respective communities.

The Nigeria Diabetes Community partnered with the ministry of health to train the students on Diabetes education and Advocacy with the aim of creating adequate diabetes awareness at community level.

Special guests with The Honorable Commissioner for Health
Special guests with The Honorable Commissioner for Health

The Honorable Commissioner for Health Dr. Olaokun Soyinka charged the children to be health ambassadors in their communities creating passionate change that will make the communities a safer environment and healthier.

Among distinguished guests present at the launch are the representatives from Ogun State ministry of education, Dangote Groups, Talabi Diabetes Center, Unity Bank, Eli Lilly Pharmaceuticals and The Nigeria Diabetes Community .

Diabeducation manual for secondary school students
Diabeducation manual for secondary school students

A team of 10 participants to include students, a school teacher and school health worker from 10 schools across the 3 geographical zones in the states were trained.

Cross Section of Participants at the Program
Cross Section of Participants at the Program

 

It is expected that the team will  translate the knowledge acquired during the training to their colleagues at school and their respective communities.

Followup on their activities will be done through the school health unit of the department of public health.

PHOTOSPEAKS

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Facilitators
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Cross section of secondary school students
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Cross section of participants
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Cross section of secondary school students
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Cross section of secondary school students
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NGdoc Co-Founder speaking on ‘You too can save a life;role of youths in diabetes advocacy’
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A training unit with their facilitator
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A training unit with their facilitator
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A training unit with their facilitator
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Facilitators Meeting prior to the event at The Commissioner for health conference room.

 

Our Profound Gratitude goes to everyone who has supported this program and made it a reality most especially the sponsors of the diabeducation project:
Eli Lilly Pharmaceuticals
Mr Olumuyiwa Talabi – Talabi Diabetes Center
Dr Gbadebo Saba – Owokoniran Memorial Hospital
Dr Dunni Osofisan
Dr Okubenna Oladunni
Dr Tosin Ojo
Alhaja R.O Balogun

Diabetes and Sickle Cell Anaemia

The burden of Diabetes in resource poor settings are enormous and coupling it with other co-morbidities might not be a very pleasant experience.

A couple of days ago I met a young lady in her early 30s who was recently diagnosed with diabetes. Looking at her facie I requested for her genotype done and was surprised when the result came and she is SS- Sickle Cell Anaemia.

In my 3 years of Advocacy it has never occurred to me a possibility of both conditions coexisting and this lady got me thinking so I decided to conduct a mini research into it.

Sickle-cell disease (SCD ), also known as sickle-cell anaemia (SCA ) , is an inherited blood disorder , characterized by an abnormality in the oxygen carrying haemoglobin molecule in red blood cells .

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This leads to a propensity for the cells to assume an abnormal, rigid, sickle -like shape under certain circumstances. Sickle-cell disease is associated with a
number of acute and chronic health problems, such as severe infections, attacks of severe pain (“sickle-cell crisis”), and stroke , and there is an increased risk of death.

According to an article on Medscape, clinical experience in tropical countries with a high incidence of SCD indicates that the concurrence of SCD with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes is a rare finding.

Although there are no population-based data to determine the relative prevalence of diabetes among patients with SCD in the tropics, it seems that the SCD population enjoys relative ‘protection’ from diabetes.
Theoretical mechanisms for such protection would include the low BMI, hypermetabolism, and possibly other genetic factors.

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The situation in the tropics might be quite different from that in affluent countries, where blood transfusions are more widely used to palliate the anemia of SCD.

According to this article iron overload due to multiple transfusions can result in β-cell damage and decreased insulin production. The result can range from glucose intolerance to frank diabetes that requires insulin for control.

The analysis revealed that, for every 10 years of transfusion use, transfused subjects with SCD had 2.5-times greater odds of diabetes. The analysis showed, moreover, that transfused patients with thalassemia had 5.2-fold greater odds of diabetes compared with transfused patients with SCD.

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But beyond this scientific expose there is need for specialized adequate medical care for people living with diabetes and those who might have other co-existing morbidities such that the burden won’t lead to state of hopelessness, depression and mortality.

Food for thought:

After interacting with her I discovered she is from a middle class family hence she might be able to get her medical supplies but what if she were from a family living below the UN $1 a day poverty benchmark?
What will be her fate?

NGOs and advocates should brace up to stand for equity in medical access across board and a health system that can cater for people in dire need for support and care.

Adejumo Olamide H.

Contact us on thengdoc@gmail.com

Join the Nigeria Diabetes Online Community on twitter @theNGdoc and visit our website and blog www.ngdoc.com and www.ngdocblog.com respectively for more information.

Just One Less Sugary Drink A Day Makes A Difference

Just One Less Sugary Drink A Day Makes A Difference

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A new study on Diabetologia says that every 5% of a person’s daily energy intake that comes from sugary drinks correlates to an 18% higher risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes – that’s almost a 20% greater risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes for ever glass of sugary soda!

“The good news is that our study provides evidence that replacing a daily serving of a sugary soft drink or sugary milk drink with water or unsweetened tea or coffee can help cut the risk of diabetes,” said researcher Dr. Forouhi, adding that this allows them to “(offer) practical suggestions for healthy alternative drinks for the prevention of diabetes.”

The researchers’ analysis of the data, which accounted for a range of factors such as total energy intake, found that soft drinks and other sweetened beverages posed a particularly insidious risk, as opposed to the consumption of natural fruit juice, coffee, or tea.

News and Image Credit: Daily Health Post

DIABEDUCATION

INTRODUCTION

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Currently in Nigeria, the emphasis of most policies and interventions is on screening and early treatment.

Though diabetes education forms a part of most strategies, screening of people at risk is the main focus.
The current strategies that exist in Nigeria are mainly health-care facility based and as such do not provide adequate information to the teeming population.

According to the IDF Diabetes Atlas (2013), about 3.9million out of the 78 million adult population in Nigeria (20-79years) is diabetic.
This puts the National prevalence of type 2 diabetes at approximately 5%. According to the same report, about 105,000 diabetes related deaths occurred in 2013.

There is thus a need for improved diabetes education and awareness

WHY DIABEDUCATION?

DIABEDUCATION is aimed at imbibing healthy living lifestyle, good physical activities among young individuals as well as make them diabetes advocates in their schools and communities through adequate diabetes education in a “catch them young approach”.

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The training manual was developed to teach basic symptomalogy of the disease in easy to understand plain language for children and adults as well as utilizing community focused advocacy methods and via the use of social media- the latest social trend as a veritable tool for diabetes advocacy.

With Nigeria’s mobile subscriber base estimated to grow by a significant 14 percent this year to 120 million, utilization of social media in youth health advocacy will help educate, motivate, encourage, and act as a viable propagation medium for adequate diabetes information and education among Nigerians.

With this project we will be directly training over a hundred secondary school students across Ogun State who will then create awareness and educate their peers and community hence indirectly affecting over a hundred thousand individuals across the state.

Our profound gratitude goes to The Ogun State Government, The Ogun State Ministry of Health and the Department of Public health and School health board for the tremendous support.

We also say a big thank you to the Honorable Commissioner for Health for Ogun State, Dr Olaokun Soyinka, Mr Talabi Olumuyiwa – Patron of The Talabi Diabetes Center, the Directors, Facilitators, Volunteers, Sponsors and finally our contributing authors.

This program is scheduled to hold on the 16th of April, 2015. Follow the hashtag #diabeducation on Twitter and on Facebook.

Interested in being a part of the program either as a sponsor or volunteer? Please send us an email on thengdoc@gmail.com

DIABETES AND HEALTHY LIVING – THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY BATTLE

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Few decades ago, I moulded sand castles as kid, rolled abandoned car tyres around street corners, woke up each morning to the crowing of the cock – life was serene and unperturbed.

As the world has evolved and technology has improved, computer games have fast replaced outdoor games; kids now learn even their basic nursery rhymes on ‘iPads’.
Loud zooms of fast-moving cars, blaring of horns, footsteps of workers hurrying out before dawn to beat traffic to work has taken over the function of my alarm clock. Welcome to the 21st century!

The “fast and furious” demands of the 21st century are not without their tolls on our health; recourse to a sedentary lifestyle, increased stress level, on-the-go meals to say the least.

One of the most devastating effects of our new way of life in this century is the increase in the number of people being diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes is a disease of the body’s ability to appropriately utilize sugar, the primary metabolic fuel.

It is a major health concern of the world we live in today, affecting about 400 million people worldwide and accounting for about 5 million deaths annually from its complications which include problems with but not limited to the kidneys (Diabetic nephropathy), eyes (Diabetic retinopathy), nerves (Diabetic neuropathy), poor wound healing, and the heart.

The world’s population has grown from 6.2 billion to about 7 billion in the last decade putting an untold pressure on food production. The resultant effect is production of more processed and synthetic food, making healthy diet more expensive on the average.

Obesity being one of the biggest risk factors of diabetes, hence, healthy diet is of paramount importance. Leafy vegetables, fresh fruits, whole grains cereals, lean meat, fish and nuts should be incorporated.

Corporate organisations now carry out much of their work in virtual offices,many staffers of such organisations do a lot of their tasks on the computer than around the office space. “Work” now colloquially refers to sitting behind a desk pressing the computer all day.

Sedentary life style is another big risk factor. Regular exercise is key. Work-out frequently. Why don’t you try walking down the road for ten minutes before calling a cab,when you go to work tomorrow and subsequently.

Take the “#bigbluetest” as often as you can.
We have deadlines to beat and targets to meet daily. We often need ready-made refreshments or other energy source. Take water or unsweetened coffee instead of processed fruit juice or carbonated drinks.

Peanut butter instead of chocolate or jam spread on bread, nuts and freshly-made fruit juice or sugar-free yoghurt for snacks instead of hamburger and ‘coke’.
Avoid simple sugars
Do not skip breakfast; this is associated with weight gain. Rather, go for smaller ration par meal with a healthy breakfast being pivotal. Choose whole grain bread over white bread, brown rice to replace white rice, whole grain pasta instead of processed ones.

The internet has become part of the fabric of our everyday life. Its use elevates dopamine (the juice of addiction) levels just like cocaine does.

We all are guilty as our devices are never really more than one foot away. The wrong use of the social network has made antisocial beings out of us. Before checking what you have missed online, take some aerobics.

More importantly, monitor your weight and blood sugar level from time to time as early diagnosis and prompt management is central to good prognosis. Whether diabetic or pre-diabetic, living healthy in the 21st century,even with its demands on our health is possible, though a difficult battle, its also winnable.

Join an advocacy group to promote awareness through social media. Take a “blue-circle selfie” and tag along your tweets. Let us propagate the message together and we shall stand tall.

The winning Essay written by Omole Temitope @omoleMD