Category Archives: Information

A Bad Case- An Original Comedy Series Surrounding Diabetes

A Bad Case is an original comedy series about four friends and what happens when diabetes shows up at the worst possible moment. It is  a message of hope to the world. It’s comedy about when diabetes goes all wrong and easily relatable.

According to Erin Spinento who also directed the movie:

Hollywood has consistently gotten our story wrong. They have used diabetes as a handy plot tool to raise the stakes for a story. From minor mistakes to huge blunders, they are sharing an inaccurate story of what it means to live with diabetes.

It is time to change that narrative. It is time to have our stories told accurately and in depth. A Bad Case is the story of four friends who handle their diabetes very differently. There is a good chance you will see yourself in at least one of the characters on screen. For the first time, a viewer might be able to relate to someone just like her, who has the same outlook or quirks, who has developed the same strategies for dealing.

Knowing how crucial a positive outlook is on doing a good job of taking care of diabetes, a series that focuses on diabetes and humor could have an incredible impact on those who are struggling with the difficulty of this condition.

Personally, the only way I can deal with such a long-term and difficult situation is to find the humor, even if it is a sort of gallows humor. When we can come to a point of laughing at the absurd difficulty, we gain perspective and a renewed sense of strength to keep on fighting.  

I want to produce this series to explore a new medium for pursuing the same mission I have always had when it comes to interacting with the diabetes community; to empower people to take amazing care of their diabetes.

You can watch, follow the series and support the project here

For interviews or more info, please contact:

Erin Spineto, Sea Peptide Productions. erin@seapeptide.com

World BreastFeeding Week; Mothers who breastfeed for 6 months have 48 percent less risk of diabetes

The world breast feeding week just wrapped up and theme was  “Breastfeeding: the foundation for life”

NgDOC is excited to promote and celebrate with the rest of the world.

“There could be greater health benefits for women from breastfeeding than previously recognized,” said lead study author Erica Gunderson of the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland, California.

Compared to women who didn’t breastfeed at all, mothers who nursed babies for at least six months were 48 percent less likely to develop diabetes. Mothers who also breastfed for fewer than 6 months had 25 percent lower risk of developing diabetes.

In the past, it has been well known that aside from promoting good brain development because of some specific proteins like cysteine and taurine in breast milk, breastfeeding reduces the risk of a child developing allergic reactions, respiratory infections and now even diabetes!

It was a 30 year long study analyzed by researchers in the US from women in a heart health study and monitored throughout that time.

Scientists believe that there are good biological reasons why breastfeeding may protect against diabetes. For example, it is known to boost hormones which control blood insulin levels and lower blood sugar. It can also help new mothers lose pregnancy weight.

“We found a very strong association between breastfeeding duration and lower risk of developing diabetes, even after accounting for all possible confounding risk factors,” said lead author Dr Erica Gunderson, senior research scientist with the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in California.

“The incidence of diabetes decreased in a graded manner as breastfeeding duration increased, regardless of race, gestational diabetes, lifestyle behaviors, body size, and other metabolic risk factors measured before pregnancy, implying the possibility that the underlying mechanism may be biological.”

“Breastfed babies are also less likely to become overweight later in life, reducing their risk of developing cancer in the future as well.”

Breastfeeding also reduces the risk for breast cancer in the mother.

This makes breastfeeding protective for both mother and child.

Only about 36% of infants aged 0-6 months worldwide were exclusively breastfed over the period of 2007-2014. The lives of over 820,000 children could be saved every year among children under 5 years, if all children 0-23 months were optimally breastfed.

WHO recommends exclusive breastfeeding starting within one hour after birth until a baby is 6 months old to promote health.

In spite of the benefits of breastfeeding, some women may face barriers to success, including lack of social support, lack of paid leave and lack of onsite childcare. Since breastfeeding provides a tremendous benefit for the child, mom and society, we want to keep encouraging women to breastfeed and create environments that support success.

The research was published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

 

How Real Madrid’s Nacho did not let Diabetes Stop Him

Heartbreak is an overused word in football, tagged on to every last-minute defeat, relegation or omission from a squad list. Real Madrid and Spain defender Nacho Fernandez Iglesias knows what it really means.

Real Madrid and Spain defender Nacho. Picture: Instagram / Nacho Fernandez Iglesias
Real Madrid and Spain defender Nacho. Picture: Instagram / Nacho Fernandez Iglesias

 

‘I was about 12 years old and had been at Real Madrid for a couple of years. It was a dream come true for a young boy to play in that shirt,’ he says.

‘I was about to go off and play a tournament with Real Madrid but I didn’t feel right.

‘I had this constant need to pee and I was drinking lots and lots of water. My mother was worried.

‘She decided to call the hospital. They carried out some tests and my blood-sugar levels were through the roof. I was diagnosed with (type 1) diabetes.

‘On the Friday the doctor told me there was no way I could go on playing football. Imagine any 12-year-old kid being told that. It was awful.’

Real Madrid and Spain defender Nacho. Picture: Instagram / Nacho Fernandez Iglesias
Real Madrid and Spain defender Nacho. Picture: Getty Image

It was 2002 and as well as playing in the club’s boys’ teams, Nacho was a Madrid fan who idolised Fernando Hierro and Zinedine Zidane. His dream of following Zidane into the first team had been crushed but the heartbreak would be short-lived.

‘On the Monday I went back into the hospital and I saw a different doctor, Dr Ramirez,’ he explains, and there is warmth in his voice when he says that second doctor’s name.

‘I was so happy because he said the opposite was true. He said sport was the most important thing for me and I had to carry on playing and competing. It wasn’t true that my condition meant I couldn’t be a sportsman. And here I am still fighting.’

Nine years later Jose Mourinho gave Nacho  his Real Madrid debut. Zidane is now his manager. He’s on his way to Kiev for his third Champions League final and then off to Russia with Spain.

The 28-year-old may be Madrid’s ‘fifth’ defender but many supporters would have him in the team. He is one of their own. They idolise him as the anti-galactico who still lives in the Madrid town of Alcala de Henares where he grew up and not in a gated millionaires-only neighbourhood.

If he does start on the bench on Saturday there will be no devastation. After being told he would never have a career, he is just happy to be there. Happy to have proved a player can cope with diabetes and still reach the top. ‘Diabetes doesn’t mean as a young kid you can’t have a normal life and practising sport is the most important thing in combating it,’ he says.

‘I have to give myself injections every day and I have to take care with food and drink that have a high sugar level. But sport for a person with diabetes is fundamental.’

When his debut came, it was Mourinho who gave it to him. He says: ‘I’ve only got good things to say about Mourinho. It’s not true that he doesn’t give young players a chance. He gave my brother Alex (now at Cadiz) his debut too, before me. In our family there is a lot of love for Mourinho.’

Nacho’s progression is not just an example for kids with medical conditions, he is also a beacon for homegrown players.

‘The canteranos (youth-team graduates) can be the soul of the club. Madrid is a difficult club to break through at because they have always had the best players. But the presence of homegrown players alongside the superstars has been fundamental.’

Zidane will hope that combination can deliver against Liverpool on Saturday night.

‘They have three spectacular players up front,’ says Nacho. ‘They are quick and they score goals. They will make it difficult but we have the defenders to deal with the threat.’

Woman Living With Diabetes No Longer Needs Insulin After Bioengineered Pancreas Transplant

The major problem with type 1 diabetes is that the body produces antibodies that attack the body’s healthy islet cells in the pancreas which produces insulin. This limits insulin production making the body the body unable to make use of glucose gotten from diet leading to high blood sugar. The patient then has to makes rely on insulin injections or pumps to survive.

Before now, several research works have being aimed at transplanting islet cells from deceased donors into the liver but this has not been ideal The liver can only take few islet cells and with risk of bleeding.
Recently, researchers at the University of Miami Diabetes Research Institute have tried another location – the omentum, a fatty membrane in the belly.

A 43 year old single mother with a 25 year history of type 1 diabetes has been off insulin for over a year following islet cell transplant in the omentum. Before the transplant, she was said to have been on about 33 units of insulin per day. No surgical complications were observed during the procedure.

The researchers said

“The cells began producing insulin faster than expected, and after one year she is doing well and doesn’t need insulin injections”.

“We’re exploring a way to optimize islet cell therapy to a larger population. This study gives us hope for a different transplant approach,”

Dr. David Baidal, assistant professor in the University of Miami Research Institute who led the study said. The research is the first step towards developing a mini organ called BioHub.

The BioHub would be like a home to the islet cells providing it with blood supply and nutrition, making it easier to remove in cases of complications. The researchers plan to test the use of omentum as a site in 5 new patients.

IMPROVED LIFESTYLE
Baidal explained that

“Her quality of life was severely impacted. She had to move in with her parents. And, if she traveled, she had to travel with her father”.

This is indeed good news.
This is a step in the positive direction for about 422 million people worldwide living diabetes. It would also markedly save cost for insulin in the long term.
More information of this ground breaking research headed by Dr David A. Baidal can be seen in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Meanwhile, you can win an all expense paid trip to a Diabetes youth camp in Ghana. Click here for details

Facts You Might Never Have Heard About Diabetes

1. The earliest description of Diabetes is in an Egyptian medical papyrus called Ebers papyrus describing “too great amount of urine”

2. The term diabetes was first used by Apollinus of Memphis 250AD

3. The Greek Physician Aretaeus (30-90CE) recorded a disease that caused ex-cessive thirst, urination and weight loss. The word “diabetes” is Greek for “siphon” describing the excess urine.

4. Galen, a physician and philosopher in the Roman empire commented that he had only seen 2 cases in his career (probably due to better diet and life-style). Galen named the disease “diarrhea of the urine” (diarrhea urinosa).

5. The term “mellitus” or “from honey” was added by the Briton John Rolle in the late 1700s to separate the condition from diabetes insipidus, which is also associated with frequent urination. It is said that some physicians tast-ed the urine in early times to aid in diagnosis.

6. In 1910, an English physiologist Sir Edward Albert Sharpey-Schafer discov-ered that a component was missing from the pancreas of diabetics and he called it “insulin”.

7. Before insulin, the only treatment for type 1 diabetes was starvation, which was of course, ineffective, extending life for only a few years.

8. In 1921, Canadian physician Frederick Banting and medical student Charles H. Best discovered the hormone insulin in pancreatic extracts of dogs. One year later, Banting was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. At the age of 32, he was the youngest Nobel laureate ever in this category.

Charles Best and Banting

9. The first people to ever receive insulin were Frederick Banting and Charles Best – they injected insulin into each other’s arms to see if it was safe on humans.

10. Banting was bad at spelling and first spelt diabetes as “diabetus”

11. Banting never profited from insulin and gave the patent for free to provide insulin for all.

12. Friedrick Banting was honored by World Diabetes Day which is held on his birthday, November 14

13. Leonard Thompson, 14, a charity patient at the Toronto General Hospital, became the first person to receive and injection of insulin to treat diabetes in January 1922. He lived another 13 years before dying of pneumonia at age 27.

14. Before the 20th century, tasting urine was the test for Diabetes

15. In 1969-1970, the first portable blood glucose meter was created by Ames Diagnostics.

16. Diabetes also occurs in animals like dogs and cats. It is more common in the female dog and the male cat. It has also been reported in horses, dolphins, foxes and hippopotamus
17.

The blue circle is the universal symbol for diabetes. Amongst other things, it signifies unity showing our combined strength in diabetes campaign. It was designed in 2006 by the International Diabetes Federation. The blue border of the circle reflects the colour of the sky and the flag of the United Nations.

18. An insulin requiring individual would spend 29 percent of his monthly income on insulin in Nigeria with payment being mostly “out of pocket”

19. Currently oral hypoglycemic drugs are readily available in Nigeria but insulin is less so.

20. Common alternative medicine used by Nigerians is vernonia amygdalina (bitter leaf) with the belief that bitter taste would counteract the “ sweetness” of blood. Nigerian researchers have reported lowering of blood glucose in diabetic rats comparable to that diabetic rats on oral hypoglycemic drugs though more research in humans is needed in this area.

21. Inhaled insulin is an emerging 21st century innovation. Companies are also working on insulin tablets that can simply be placed under the tongue.

22. About 422 million people worldwide have diabetes and this is more in low and middle income countries. In 2012, it was the direct cause of 1.5 million deaths.

23. A Nigerian study found that gestational diabetes to occur in 2.98 per 1000 pregnancies.

24. A Harvard study showed that eating one serving of cooked oatmeal two to 4 times a week was linked to 14 percent reduction in type 2 diabetes risk

25. WHO says taking brisk , 30 minutes walk,5 days a week can reduce diabetes risk

26. Men with diabetes are at greater risk of erectile dysfunction than those without it.
27. People with diabetes can live long and healthy lives with their diabetes detected and well managed

28. Celebrities like Nick Jonas, member of Jonas Brothers was diagnosed in 200k but went public in 2007.

29. Halle Berry was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at 22 years old after she reportedly went into a diabetic coma.

30. About one third of people with diabetes do not know they have the it.

Reference
Diabetes in Nigeria – past, present and future by AO Ogbera

Be our guest blogger. Send your articles to thengdoc@gmail.com

RAMADAN KAREEM

Ramadan_Kareem_2_by_meanart

This is the period where our dear muslim friends, family and colleagues fast for a period of time. Fasting during Ramadan, a holy month of Islam, is an obligatory duty for all healthy adult Muslims and its duration varies between 29 and 30 days. Its timing changes with respect to seasons.

Depending on the geographical location and season,the duration of the daily fast may range from a few to more than 20 hours. Muslims who fast during Ramadan must abstain from eating, drinking, use of oral medications, and smoking from predawn to after sunset; however, there are no restrictions on food or fluid intake between sunset and dawn.

Most people consume two meals per day during this month, one after sunset, referred to in Arabic as Iftar (breaking of the fast meal), and the other before dawn, referred to as Suhur (predawn).
Now the question is, what food or fluid intake do one use to break or start this fasting.

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As we know, fasting is not meant to create excessive hardship on the Muslim individual.
Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder which may place one at high risk for various complications if the pattern and amount of meal and fluid intake is markedly altered.

Due to loss of energy, weakness and dehydration. Most people rush for food that contains carbohydrate. Foods like rice, yam, spaghetti etc, inorder to gain their strength back.

This is not right, it only increases blood sugar which makes one restless and dizzy, which only makes matter worse. So how can we live healthy, during this fasting period.

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1.) Water should be the first intake as soon as one wants to break fast. We must ensure we take as much as possible throughout the evening till dawn. It will help the circulation of blood in ones system, reduce dehydration and cleanse it. Avoid drinks with caffeine.

2.) Start meal with fruits. Fruits like watermelon, oranges,blueberries-Blueberries are awesome choice. They are packed with dietary fiber, vitamin C, and flavonoids. Flavonoids are phytonutrients and help to boost ones immune system and fight off infection. They could also help fight off bad cholesterol and keep the heart and arteries healthy.
Grapefruits-They are packed with antioxidants, especially in the ruby red variety. It lowers bad cholesterol by 20% and triglycerides by 17%.

3.) Take in enough protein. Due to not eating anything for over 17-20hrs, the body will be feeding on itself. So there is need to rebuild this areas. Source of protein that will be good includes;
Tofu-Even if not a vegetarian, tofu is a great product to integrate in diet. It is made from soy, which is high in niacin, folate, zinc, potassium, iron, and the fatty acid alpha-linolenic. This can turn into the hugely beneficial omega-3 fatty acid

Beans-Beans are a great alternative because they are high in fiber and protein. They are also packed with vitamins and minerals like folate, iron, magnesium, and potassium.

Also, other meals like brown rice, amala (instead of yam flour try plaintain flour), wheat flour( easily digested), non- starchy vegetables, fish, skinless chicken etc.

While the iftar meal is a celebration time, try not to overeat.
Keep sensible portions in mind and follow the same guidelines for healthy eating done during the rest of the year with emphasis on whole grains, lean sources of meat, fish and poultry and small amounts of heart healthy fats.

This Article is written by Damilola Shobiye a Student of Nutrition and Dietetics from Babcock University, Ilishan-Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria.
To be our Guest Blogger on the Nigeria Diabetes Online Community kindly send your article to us on thengdoc@gmail.com, follow us on @theNGdoc and like our facebook page www.facebook.com/NGDOC

Merck Diabetes and Hypertension Awards

Merck Diabetes Award

All medical undergraduates and postgraduates are invited to apply for the

Merck Diabetes Award 2017
Theme: Every Day is a Diabetes Day

Please submit a concept paper about:

  • How to improve the awareness about Diabetes Early Detection and Prevention in your country.
  • How to encourage your society, scientific community, local authorities, media and relevant stakeholders to Think and Act on Diabetes Every Day.
  • Your ideas of developing new policies, strategies, social media campaigns and more.

 

Merck Diabetes Award 2017

is:

“Postgraduate Diabetes Diploma with University of South Wales. Winners will be invited to attend the Merck Africa Luminary on 24th-25th October, 2017 in Cairo, Egypt to receive the award”.

Merck Diabetes Award is being rolled out in many of the African and Asian universities as part of our commitment to building diabetes capacity and improving access to quality and sustainable healthcare solutions in developing countries.

The aim of Merck Diabetes Award is to create a Diabetes Experts Platform across the globe.

Please submit your one page concept paper to:
submit@merckdiabetesaward.com

Submission deadline is 31st July 2017

Entry requirements:

Postgraduate Diploma

Health professionals, both UK and overseas, with an honors degree or equivalent (including international qualifications) are eligible to apply for the PG Diploma Diabetes course online.

Non graduates are also encouraged to apply (applicants will be asked to submit a piece of work for assessment to confirm that they are able to work comfortably at degree level).

Applicants should submit copies of the following with their application:

  • qualification certificates
  • one written reference
  • English language qualification (IELTS 6.5 or equivalent) please see University of South Wales for further details

Merck Hypertension Award

All medical undergraduates and postgraduates are invited to apply for the

Merck Hypertension Award 2017

Theme: What the Healthy Heart needs

Merck Hypertension Award is being rolled out in many of the African and Asian universities as part of our commitment to building healthcare capacity and improving access to quality and sustainable healthcare solutions in developing countries.

The aim of Merck Hypertension Award is to create a Hypertension Experts Platform across the globe.

To raise the required awareness to control and prevent hypertension, countries need systems, policies and services in place to promote universal health coverage and support healthy lifestyles: eating a balanced diet, reducing salt intake, avoiding harmful use of alcohol, getting regular exercise and stopping the use of tobacco.

Please submit a concept paper about:

  • How to improve the awareness about hypertension control and prevention in your country.
  • How to encourage your society, scientific community, local authorities, media and relevant stakeholders to think and act on Hypertension Every Day
  • Your ideas of developing new policies, strategies, social media campaigns and more.

Merck Hypertension Award 2017
is:

“Postgraduate Diploma in Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine with University of South Wales. Winners will be invited to attend the Merck Africa Luminary on 24th-25th October 2017 in Cairo, Egypt to receive the award”.

Please submit your one page concept paper to:
submit@MerckHypertensionAward.com

Submission deadline is 31st July 2017

Entry requirements:

Postgraduate Diploma

Health professionals, both UK and overseas, with an honors degree or equivalent (including international qualifications) are eligible to apply for the PG Diploma Diabetes course online.

Non graduates are also encouraged to apply (applicants will be asked to submit a piece of work for assessment to confirm that they are able to work comfortably at degree level).

Applicants should submit copies of the following with their application:

  • qualification certificates
  • one written reference
  • English language qualification (IELTS 6.5 or equivalent) please see University of South Wales for further details

For more information visit Merk’s Official website

MYTH 2: DIABETES IS A DEATH SENTENCE by Opawale Damilola

We recently started the discussion about Myths and Facts on Diabetes. If you missed the last post, kindly click here.

Today, we will continue on the discussion

MYTH 2: DIABETES IS A DEATH SENTENCE

FACT

Diabetes is not a death sentence. We established the last time that diabetes is a serious condition and is presently not curable. However, a diabetes diagnosis does not mean that you have been given an “expiry date”. It simply means you have to pay more attention to your health than before. 

There are several people who have lived with the disease for many years, some several decades and still living normal healthy lives without complications. 

We have a few testimonials from some of them:

Miss O.O, 17 years old – “I have been diabetic for 5 years. My living has been managed through regular use of Insulin, daily exercise, controlled diet, regular blood sugar checks and regular clinic visits. I am living well and happy”

Mrs. A.C. 52 year old diabetic diagnosed 9 years ago – “Basically what keeps me going is that I take my medications regularly, I choose my food carefully and I attend clinic regularly”

Mr. J.S – “When I was first diagnosed with the disease, I went online and read articles to educate myself. Diabetes education was a life saver for me. I have relationship with my doctors and that has been of great help”

 I will make attempts to outline a few things people living with diabetes must do to ensure that they live healthy and without complications

1. Have a positive attitude: Many people die not because the disease killed them but because they allowed the diagnosis to overwhelm them. Make up your mind to be happy, positive and active regardless of the fact that you have the disease

2. Get informed – Get information from authentic sources (Your doctors, support groups, books). This will help you understand better about the disease and how it should be managed. 

3. Drug Compliance: Take your medications religiously. Let your doctors prescribe drugs for you.

4. Know yourself – You need to know yourself to be able to recognize signs of when your sugar is going too low (hypoglycemia) or too high (hyperglycemia) and you need to know what to do at those times.

5. Diet Control: Contrary to the old teaching that diabetics have to eat only unripe fruits and vegetables. Studies have shown that diabetics can actually eat most of the food every other person eats, only that they need to eat them in right proportions. It is advisable to eat more of food that are high in fibre and low in calorie. Your doctor should educate you more about this.

6. Regular exercise: This also helps to control your blood sugar better, reduce weight, slows down ageing and improves heart function. However, rigorous exercise is not advised. Exercises recommended include brisk walking, swimming, cycling, Dancing, Playing court games, etc. 

7. Regular Clinic visit

8. Regular blood sugar checks

9. Avoid cigarette and alcohol consumption. These can worsen the disease.

10. Weight loss

11. Participate in support groups. 

People living with diabetes will benefit a lot from family support. 

In conclusion, Diabetes is a serious health condition which may have devastating consequences if not properly managed. 

People living with the disease must be ready to take responsibility for their health and they can live normal healthy lives. 

Please feel free to drop your questions and comments.

Feel free to send your diabetes related articles to thengdoc@gmail.com

Dr Oluwadamilola Opawale is a medical practitioner with interest in Public health and preventive medicine. She has had a stint of experience from the famous St. Nicholas hospital as a clinician.

She is also the President of IBuildAfrica Foundation, an NGO that reaches out to female adolescents, helping them maximize their potentials environment and background notwithstanding.

She has a passion to teach people how to stay healthy by imbibing healthy lifestyle and choices. 

TYPE[1]WRITER TO FACILITATE INSULIN ACCESS TO NIGERIAN CWDS

This was the start of a beautiful friendship and the creation of our diabetes project. Back in 2013 I had the pleasure of meeting Adejumo Hakeem from Nigeria.

We’d been in constant communication prior to the International Diabetes Federation Conference in Melbourne as I’d managed to win their essay competition, ‘Diabetes in Nigeria: Protecting the Future’.

I even went on to write my masters on ‘The Relationship Between Urbanisation and Type 2 Diabetes: a human rights-based approach to health in Nigeria’. So here we were, online friends from New Zealand and Nigeria, finally able to cross the ocean and meet in person.

screen-shot-2016-11-15-at-00-12-43

It’s been 6 months since the book was launched and the sales are still doing great. The profits from my book go directly to Adejumo at NGdoc to aid children with type 1 diabetes in Nigeria who do not have access to the supplies they need to survive. There are already stories of young children who we, and our consumers, have supported. If you have bought a book – YOU helped a child!

Our very first child was enough to spur us on, the fact that we’d made a difference in someone’s life is very humbling. Oluwatimileyin Daniel was 14 years old and in a state of diabetes ketoacidosis in hospital as his family had no money to buy insulin. Through our partnership we were able to pay for both the insulin and glucometer test strips he needed. He was lucky, many are not.

If you want to help us make a difference you can buy the book, or the cheaper e-book version on Amazon. If your child has type 1 diabetes they will hopefully love the book and be saving another child at the same time

Culled from type1writerblog 

Carrie Hetherington can be contacted here

FDA APPROVES ARTIFICIAL PANCREASE SYSTEM.

According to the American Diabetes Association, the FDA approved the first hybrid insulin delivery system on the 28th of September, 2016. 

This critical step, according to the ADA website in the development of an artificial pancreas is an important milestone for people with type 1 diabetes.

The MiniMed 670G is the first pump-sensor system to automatically adjust basal insulin levels, up or down, based on continuous glucose readings from an integrated continuous glucose monitor.

Patients will continue to make insulin dosing decisions at mealtime, with the MiniMed 670G providing dose recommendations based on the patient’s blood glucose levels and trends.

Patients will also need to perform finger-stick glucose checks for calibration of the device. 

The system is appropriate for anyone who is currently using or is a good candidate for an insulin pump. 

The FDA has approved the MiniMed 670G for people age 14 and older.

We are excited for this advancement, and we look forward to the development of the next phase of automated systems that can provide bolus doses of insulin. We envision that these incremental innovations will lead to a fully automated closed-loop system to provide optimal glucose control and independence for people with diabetes.

HOW DOES A CONTINUOS GLUCOSE MONITOR (CGM) WORK

CGM is a way to measure glucose levels in real-time throughout the day and night. 

A tiny electrode called a glucose sensor is inserted under the skin to measure glucose levels in tissue fluid. 

It is connected to a transmitter that sends the information via wireless radio frequency to a monitoring and display device. The device can detect and notify you if your glucose is reaching a high or low limit.

To engage with the Diabetes Online Community follow The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community on Facebook NGDOC and on Twitter @theNGdoc

– See more at: http://www.diabetes.org/newsroom/press-releases/2016/american-diabetes-association-FDA-approval-first-hybrid.html?referrer=https://t.co/VkIIhiSJFd#sthash.qkMPxHBk.dpuf