Category Archives: Diabetes Education

Prediabetes : a point of no return?

Diabetes is a condition where a person has high blood glucose levels due to problems with insulin production or utilization.

Insulin is an hormone produced by the Pancreas that helps to mop up glucose from the blood and mobilise it into tissues especially adipose (fatty) tissue and muscles.

Diabetes is a common word, but Prediabetes is less so.

The onset of type 2 diabetes is usually preceded by an asymptomatic preclinical state known as prediabetes.

Prediabetes is a condition where a person has higher than normal blood sugar level but not quite high enough to make a diagnosis of full blown type 2 diabetes. The progression from Prediabetes to diabetes may occur rapidly or over a couple of years depending on lifestyle modification.

The prevalence of prediabetes ranges in adults from 2.2% to 16.2% with a prevalence of 7.3% in sub-Saharan Africa.

It’s estimated that 90 percent of those with prediabetes are unaware that they have the condition. An estimated 86 million Americans have prediabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. According to American Diabetes Association, Prediabetes alone increases the risk of heart disease and stroke by 50 percent. However, no statistics is available for the Nigerian population.

An international expert panel now recommends the A1C test ( which is the measure of blood glucose over the past two to three months ) to diagnose diabetes in everyone except pregnant women. Before now, diabetes was diagnosed by checking fasting or random blood glucose.

Researchers have shown that while one blood sugar test can be elevated at a particular time, the A1C test is a surer way of diagnosing diabetes. A1C of 5.6 and below is considered normal, 5.7-6.4 is termed Prediabetes and 6.5 and above is diabetes.

Checking fasting blood sugar is however still relevant and normal fasting blood sugar (before meal in the morning) levels is usually between 70-100 mg per dl. A blood sugar level between 100-125 is considered Prediabetes or Impaired fasting glucose while that from 126 and above is diagnosed Diabetes. Random blood sugar of less than 140 is considered normal, 140-199 is prediabetes while 200 and above is diabetes.

What Increases Your Risk of Prediabetes?

The eight risk factors identified by the American Diabetes Association include

Family history

Weight (especially abdominal)

Low physical activity

Age (more common in people above 45 years)

Race/ ethnicity ( More common in the African American, Hispanic/Latino, American, Indian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander)

A history of diabetes while Pregnant

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (presence of multiple cysts in the ovary)

Other factors like high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels.

Is Prediabetes Reversible?

It’s very possible for a reversal of a Prediabetic state by healthy diet and exercise. This shows a need for regular check up to regulate blood sugar early enough.

What can be done to reverse Prediabetes?

Loosing weight and increasing physical activity and health diet can reduce or prevent the rate of progression to diabetes. Diet and exercise should focusing on loosing 5-7 percent of weight .

An Harvard School of Public Health study showed that women who took a brisk 30-minute walk every day lowered their risk for diabetes by 30 percent.

Proper management of prediabetes is important to curb the imminent type 2 diabetes epidermic.

RAMADAN KAREEM

Ramadan_Kareem_2_by_meanart

This is the period where our dear muslim friends, family and colleagues fast for a period of time. Fasting during Ramadan, a holy month of Islam, is an obligatory duty for all healthy adult Muslims and its duration varies between 29 and 30 days. Its timing changes with respect to seasons.

Depending on the geographical location and season,the duration of the daily fast may range from a few to more than 20 hours. Muslims who fast during Ramadan must abstain from eating, drinking, use of oral medications, and smoking from predawn to after sunset; however, there are no restrictions on food or fluid intake between sunset and dawn.

Most people consume two meals per day during this month, one after sunset, referred to in Arabic as Iftar (breaking of the fast meal), and the other before dawn, referred to as Suhur (predawn).
Now the question is, what food or fluid intake do one use to break or start this fasting.

Image+2

As we know, fasting is not meant to create excessive hardship on the Muslim individual.
Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder which may place one at high risk for various complications if the pattern and amount of meal and fluid intake is markedly altered.

Due to loss of energy, weakness and dehydration. Most people rush for food that contains carbohydrate. Foods like rice, yam, spaghetti etc, inorder to gain their strength back.

This is not right, it only increases blood sugar which makes one restless and dizzy, which only makes matter worse. So how can we live healthy, during this fasting period.

Image+1

1.) Water should be the first intake as soon as one wants to break fast. We must ensure we take as much as possible throughout the evening till dawn. It will help the circulation of blood in ones system, reduce dehydration and cleanse it. Avoid drinks with caffeine.

2.) Start meal with fruits. Fruits like watermelon, oranges,blueberries-Blueberries are awesome choice. They are packed with dietary fiber, vitamin C, and flavonoids. Flavonoids are phytonutrients and help to boost ones immune system and fight off infection. They could also help fight off bad cholesterol and keep the heart and arteries healthy.
Grapefruits-They are packed with antioxidants, especially in the ruby red variety. It lowers bad cholesterol by 20% and triglycerides by 17%.

3.) Take in enough protein. Due to not eating anything for over 17-20hrs, the body will be feeding on itself. So there is need to rebuild this areas. Source of protein that will be good includes;
Tofu-Even if not a vegetarian, tofu is a great product to integrate in diet. It is made from soy, which is high in niacin, folate, zinc, potassium, iron, and the fatty acid alpha-linolenic. This can turn into the hugely beneficial omega-3 fatty acid

Beans-Beans are a great alternative because they are high in fiber and protein. They are also packed with vitamins and minerals like folate, iron, magnesium, and potassium.

Also, other meals like brown rice, amala (instead of yam flour try plaintain flour), wheat flour( easily digested), non- starchy vegetables, fish, skinless chicken etc.

While the iftar meal is a celebration time, try not to overeat.
Keep sensible portions in mind and follow the same guidelines for healthy eating done during the rest of the year with emphasis on whole grains, lean sources of meat, fish and poultry and small amounts of heart healthy fats.

This Article is written by Damilola Shobiye a Student of Nutrition and Dietetics from Babcock University, Ilishan-Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria.
To be our Guest Blogger on the Nigeria Diabetes Online Community kindly send your article to us on thengdoc@gmail.com, follow us on @theNGdoc and like our facebook page www.facebook.com/NGDOC

Merck Diabetes and Hypertension Awards

Merck Diabetes Award

All medical undergraduates and postgraduates are invited to apply for the

Merck Diabetes Award 2017
Theme: Every Day is a Diabetes Day

Please submit a concept paper about:

  • How to improve the awareness about Diabetes Early Detection and Prevention in your country.
  • How to encourage your society, scientific community, local authorities, media and relevant stakeholders to Think and Act on Diabetes Every Day.
  • Your ideas of developing new policies, strategies, social media campaigns and more.

 

Merck Diabetes Award 2017

is:

“Postgraduate Diabetes Diploma with University of South Wales. Winners will be invited to attend the Merck Africa Luminary on 24th-25th October, 2017 in Cairo, Egypt to receive the award”.

Merck Diabetes Award is being rolled out in many of the African and Asian universities as part of our commitment to building diabetes capacity and improving access to quality and sustainable healthcare solutions in developing countries.

The aim of Merck Diabetes Award is to create a Diabetes Experts Platform across the globe.

Please submit your one page concept paper to:
submit@merckdiabetesaward.com

Submission deadline is 31st July 2017

Entry requirements:

Postgraduate Diploma

Health professionals, both UK and overseas, with an honors degree or equivalent (including international qualifications) are eligible to apply for the PG Diploma Diabetes course online.

Non graduates are also encouraged to apply (applicants will be asked to submit a piece of work for assessment to confirm that they are able to work comfortably at degree level).

Applicants should submit copies of the following with their application:

  • qualification certificates
  • one written reference
  • English language qualification (IELTS 6.5 or equivalent) please see University of South Wales for further details

Merck Hypertension Award

All medical undergraduates and postgraduates are invited to apply for the

Merck Hypertension Award 2017

Theme: What the Healthy Heart needs

Merck Hypertension Award is being rolled out in many of the African and Asian universities as part of our commitment to building healthcare capacity and improving access to quality and sustainable healthcare solutions in developing countries.

The aim of Merck Hypertension Award is to create a Hypertension Experts Platform across the globe.

To raise the required awareness to control and prevent hypertension, countries need systems, policies and services in place to promote universal health coverage and support healthy lifestyles: eating a balanced diet, reducing salt intake, avoiding harmful use of alcohol, getting regular exercise and stopping the use of tobacco.

Please submit a concept paper about:

  • How to improve the awareness about hypertension control and prevention in your country.
  • How to encourage your society, scientific community, local authorities, media and relevant stakeholders to think and act on Hypertension Every Day
  • Your ideas of developing new policies, strategies, social media campaigns and more.

Merck Hypertension Award 2017
is:

“Postgraduate Diploma in Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine with University of South Wales. Winners will be invited to attend the Merck Africa Luminary on 24th-25th October 2017 in Cairo, Egypt to receive the award”.

Please submit your one page concept paper to:
submit@MerckHypertensionAward.com

Submission deadline is 31st July 2017

Entry requirements:

Postgraduate Diploma

Health professionals, both UK and overseas, with an honors degree or equivalent (including international qualifications) are eligible to apply for the PG Diploma Diabetes course online.

Non graduates are also encouraged to apply (applicants will be asked to submit a piece of work for assessment to confirm that they are able to work comfortably at degree level).

Applicants should submit copies of the following with their application:

  • qualification certificates
  • one written reference
  • English language qualification (IELTS 6.5 or equivalent) please see University of South Wales for further details

For more information visit Merk’s Official website

MYTH 2: DIABETES IS A DEATH SENTENCE by Opawale Damilola

We recently started the discussion about Myths and Facts on Diabetes. If you missed the last post, kindly click here.

Today, we will continue on the discussion

MYTH 2: DIABETES IS A DEATH SENTENCE

FACT

Diabetes is not a death sentence. We established the last time that diabetes is a serious condition and is presently not curable. However, a diabetes diagnosis does not mean that you have been given an “expiry date”. It simply means you have to pay more attention to your health than before. 

There are several people who have lived with the disease for many years, some several decades and still living normal healthy lives without complications. 

We have a few testimonials from some of them:

Miss O.O, 17 years old – “I have been diabetic for 5 years. My living has been managed through regular use of Insulin, daily exercise, controlled diet, regular blood sugar checks and regular clinic visits. I am living well and happy”

Mrs. A.C. 52 year old diabetic diagnosed 9 years ago – “Basically what keeps me going is that I take my medications regularly, I choose my food carefully and I attend clinic regularly”

Mr. J.S – “When I was first diagnosed with the disease, I went online and read articles to educate myself. Diabetes education was a life saver for me. I have relationship with my doctors and that has been of great help”

 I will make attempts to outline a few things people living with diabetes must do to ensure that they live healthy and without complications

1. Have a positive attitude: Many people die not because the disease killed them but because they allowed the diagnosis to overwhelm them. Make up your mind to be happy, positive and active regardless of the fact that you have the disease

2. Get informed – Get information from authentic sources (Your doctors, support groups, books). This will help you understand better about the disease and how it should be managed. 

3. Drug Compliance: Take your medications religiously. Let your doctors prescribe drugs for you.

4. Know yourself – You need to know yourself to be able to recognize signs of when your sugar is going too low (hypoglycemia) or too high (hyperglycemia) and you need to know what to do at those times.

5. Diet Control: Contrary to the old teaching that diabetics have to eat only unripe fruits and vegetables. Studies have shown that diabetics can actually eat most of the food every other person eats, only that they need to eat them in right proportions. It is advisable to eat more of food that are high in fibre and low in calorie. Your doctor should educate you more about this.

6. Regular exercise: This also helps to control your blood sugar better, reduce weight, slows down ageing and improves heart function. However, rigorous exercise is not advised. Exercises recommended include brisk walking, swimming, cycling, Dancing, Playing court games, etc. 

7. Regular Clinic visit

8. Regular blood sugar checks

9. Avoid cigarette and alcohol consumption. These can worsen the disease.

10. Weight loss

11. Participate in support groups. 

People living with diabetes will benefit a lot from family support. 

In conclusion, Diabetes is a serious health condition which may have devastating consequences if not properly managed. 

People living with the disease must be ready to take responsibility for their health and they can live normal healthy lives. 

Please feel free to drop your questions and comments.

Feel free to send your diabetes related articles to thengdoc@gmail.com

Dr Oluwadamilola Opawale is a medical practitioner with interest in Public health and preventive medicine. She has had a stint of experience from the famous St. Nicholas hospital as a clinician.

She is also the President of IBuildAfrica Foundation, an NGO that reaches out to female adolescents, helping them maximize their potentials environment and background notwithstanding.

She has a passion to teach people how to stay healthy by imbibing healthy lifestyle and choices. 

NGDOC D-Meetup 2017

The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community is organizing a D-Meetup for Children living with diabetes in Nigeria.
The aim of the D-Meetup aims to create an amazing experience for children living with diabetes in a medically safe environment and will run over a weekend.

The activities will centre around children living with diabetes between the ages of 12 – 21 years to meet and share their experiences with one another as they learn to take responsibility for their health status and also to create in them a “I can do it” attitude as they improve on their self-esteem.

wpid-aviary_1448913080416.jpg

This meetup will include meeting with People living with Diabetes Globally, Nutritionist, Paediatric endocrinologist; Tourism; Games; Dinner amongst others.

It also will foster their physical activities and more controlled access to food relative to their experience at home while monitoring a good glycemic control.


Interested in partnering with us contact us on ngdoc@gmail.com or ngdocdmeetup@gmail.com

Do you know any child living with diabetes within the age of 12 – 21 years kindly encourage them to fill the form to participate.

Are you interested in sponsoring this event or volunteering your time and talent to make this event a success? Kindly fill this form.

HEALTHUCATE TO ORGANIZE FREE HEALTH SCREENING TO COMEMMORATE 2016 WORLD DIABETES DAY.

On November 14 every year, the whole world joins forces to raise awareness about diabetes, its prevention and management. 

This year, the theme is Eyes on Diabetes and one of the key messages is that screening for type 2 diabetes is important to modify its course and reduce the risk of complications. 

Healthucate Nigeria, a health promotion social enterprise charging to the frontlines in the fight against Nutrition Related Non-Communicable Diseases (NRNCDs) will conduct a week long free health screening exercise in Abeokuta, Ogun State to commemorate the 2016 World Diabetes Day.

Free health screenings such as blood pressure and blood sugar and Body Mass Index (BMI) would be available on Monday, 14th and Wednesday, 16th November at Healthucate’s Nutrition and Wellness Centre in Aladesanmi, Abeokuta between 9 a.m. and 12 noon. 

On Saturday, the 19th, a mobile testing clinic would be set up at Abiola Way to enable more people have access to get tested. 

On Saturday, Rapid Diagnostic Tests for malaria would also be carried out with provision of subsidized ACT drugs for positive cases.

A Nutritionist and Dietician would be on ground to offer counselling to the participants while suspected diabetes cases will be referred to a health facility. 

Through this free health screening, Healthucate hopes to test over 300 persons for diabetes type 2 and reach out to over 700 persons with information about diabetes prevention and management.

For more information, you can reach Healthucate via email at info@healthucateng.org or phone at 08154664638

FDA APPROVES ARTIFICIAL PANCREASE SYSTEM.

According to the American Diabetes Association, the FDA approved the first hybrid insulin delivery system on the 28th of September, 2016. 

This critical step, according to the ADA website in the development of an artificial pancreas is an important milestone for people with type 1 diabetes.

The MiniMed 670G is the first pump-sensor system to automatically adjust basal insulin levels, up or down, based on continuous glucose readings from an integrated continuous glucose monitor.

Patients will continue to make insulin dosing decisions at mealtime, with the MiniMed 670G providing dose recommendations based on the patient’s blood glucose levels and trends.

Patients will also need to perform finger-stick glucose checks for calibration of the device. 

The system is appropriate for anyone who is currently using or is a good candidate for an insulin pump. 

The FDA has approved the MiniMed 670G for people age 14 and older.

We are excited for this advancement, and we look forward to the development of the next phase of automated systems that can provide bolus doses of insulin. We envision that these incremental innovations will lead to a fully automated closed-loop system to provide optimal glucose control and independence for people with diabetes.

HOW DOES A CONTINUOS GLUCOSE MONITOR (CGM) WORK

CGM is a way to measure glucose levels in real-time throughout the day and night. 

A tiny electrode called a glucose sensor is inserted under the skin to measure glucose levels in tissue fluid. 

It is connected to a transmitter that sends the information via wireless radio frequency to a monitoring and display device. The device can detect and notify you if your glucose is reaching a high or low limit.

To engage with the Diabetes Online Community follow The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community on Facebook NGDOC and on Twitter @theNGdoc

– See more at: http://www.diabetes.org/newsroom/press-releases/2016/american-diabetes-association-FDA-approval-first-hybrid.html?referrer=https://t.co/VkIIhiSJFd#sthash.qkMPxHBk.dpuf

Keeping a Food Diary

Recording what you eat can help with blood glucose control and weight

Keeping a diabetes food diary is an imporatant factor to consider in living with diabetes.

It helps to understand how our body reacts to the food and medication we take.

For a start it is important to have a diary of what we eat and our medications with our blood sugar level for a week to help us better manage our diabetes.  

Benefits of Food Diary 

Helps you understand better your body’s response to the food you take.

Helps your doctor or dietitian see how you’re doing over time. It helps access what you eat, when you eat and the amount of nutrients each meals makes available to your body.

By recording your blood sugar there’s a better understanding of the particular dosage that works best for you as it reveals the trend of sugar fluctuation in the body.

Things to note in a Food Diary.

1) Meal:  Your food diary should contains details about the meals taken and snacks too, i.e what meal, the quantity  (if possible), was it home cooked or bought, the constituents in terms of protein, carbohydrates, fat and oil.

To include the quantity of water or drink taken.

2) Mood. Try to record how you are feeling when you eat, if or how long you exercised prior to eating, and record your blood sugar levels. Emotions can play a big role in what you eat, when you eat and how you manage your diabetes.

3) Exercise. Exercise is an important part of diabetes management. Track your progress, including how many steps you take per day and other activities— what exercise you did, for how long, and how intensely.

4) Medications. List what you took and the time. If you want to be more thorough, list any vitamins or supplements you have taken as well.

5) Blood sugar levels. Record your pre- and post-meal levels, as well as what you were doing at the time. Were you working? Watching TV? Talking on the phone?

However, worth noting is that many people living with diabetes sometimes go through small transition periods when eating right seems to go off the rails and so can blood glucose and it can be hard to figure out why.

But by taking the time to slow down, write things down for a week or two, and just focusing back on managing diabetes, maybe by using a diary, one is much more likely to get back on track as we account more for what we eat.

Paper diaries seem a bit ‘back to basics’ but they can really work wonders. However, you can also keep your diary on your mobile phones.

References

https://www.verywell.com/how-a-diabetes-food-diary-can-help-you-1087715

http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/food-diary.html

Raising a child living with diabetes in Africa: Challenges and Motivations

image

On May 27th The Nigeria Diabetes online Community conducted it’s monthly chat dedicated to children living with diabetes in Africa.

The chat that coincides with Children’s day in Nigeria drew participants from Nigeria, UK, South Africa and Ghana.

The children’s day chat reflects the reality that faces us as a nation and africa as a continent on the need for a vibrant healthcare sector to combat the scourge of diabetes.

All our participants have wards living with diabetes (we encourage parents and guardians to get their wards involved in social peer support chats online).

Most wards view living with diabetes as a burden (stressful,frustrating, depressive and expensive – in the words of pearl who has young relatives living with diabetes) with a few having a good insight of the condition.

Large percentage of our wards living with diabetes seemingly initially have a feeling of being the only ones with such condition in the world.
(A typical reflection of poor awareness of other children living with diabetes)

image

Living with diabetes for children has been noticed to be emotionally challenging and it’s been suggested by experience that more interaction and peer support works in Ghana with listening ears producing better results  than criticisms.

Parents and guardians have been advised to stay involved in their children’s care even if such wards is able to manage his/her diabetes.

At this point parents should be aware of that their support, respect and love for each other has a direct impact on their child’s metabolism (a good thesis for research)

It was also noted that there’s a constant battle of emotions as the children hit their teens with their tendencies to want to fit in like their friends.

In cases when their emotions are really all over the place, a constant show of love, mentoring and continuous education about diabetes has been noted to be very helpful.

It was unanimously agreed by all participants that interacting with other children living with diabetes worldwide is very helpful with NGO’s and government being actively involved in ensuring living with diabetes for our children doesn’t end up as a death sentence.

We graciously call on the minister of health in all african countries to emulate the South Africa government who is said to provide free medications to include insulin and glucose strips.

The international diabetes federation life for a child has been commended for their active support in resource poor settings where insulin, glucometers and teststrips are provided for free.

We also call on governments to ensure these supplies gets to the children import tax free.

Wouldn’t it be great to see life saving medications donated for free exempted from import tax which could be enormous?

We wish to thank all our participants for their contributions and commitments to ensuring an healthy life with diabetes is achievable by our children.

Do you have or know any child living with diabetes?
Kindly get through to us on our platforms and we will be glad to connect.
thengdoc@gmail.com
Facebook: NGDOC
Twitter: @thengdoc

The 3rd Africa Diabetes Congress (YAOUNDE 2017)

3rd AFRICA DIABETES CONGRESS CALL!

image

PRE CONGRESS WORKSHOPS 17-19 APRIL 2017

CONGRESS DATES: 19-22 APRIL 2017

CONGRESS STREAMS:

1.       Education and patients

2.       Clinical

3.       Basic sciences and physiology

4.       Epidemiology public health

5.       Endocrinology (including paediatrics and reproductive)

CORPORATE SYMPOSIA

Wednesday 19th April 2017: 3 from 14:00 – 15:30

Thursday 20th April 2017: 3 from 12.30 – 14:00 and 2 from 18:00 – 20:00

Friday 21st April 2017: 2 from 12.30 – 14:00

 

SOCIAL PROGRAMME

Opening Ceremony: Wednesday 19th April 2017 from 17:30 – 18:30

Welcome reception: Wednesday 19th April 2017 from 18:30 – 19:30

Congress dinner: Friday 21st April 2017 from 19:00 – 22:00

 

IMPORTANT DATES

First Announcement: 30th April 2016

Second Announcement and Call for Abstracts: 1stJune 2016

Abstract Dateline: 30th October 2016

Breaking Abstract Dateline: 15th January 2017

Early Registration Dateline: 1st February 2017

 

PUBLICATION OF ABSTRACTS

 

Accepted abstracts for oral presentation, poster discussion and poster display will be published in a Supplement of Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice

Congress Secretariat.

Yaounde – Cameroon.